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The persistence of market leadership: evidence from Japan

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  • Masatoshi Kato
  • Yuji Honjo

Abstract

This article explores the persistence of market leadership in Japanese manufacturing industries over the period 1975--2004. By applying survival data techniques, we examine how long market leadership persists and how the duration of market leadership varies according to industry-specific characteristics. Our findings indicate that market leaders maintain their leadership positions for, on average, 20 years from 1975 in Japanese manufacturing industries. We provide evidence that market leadership tends to persist in capital-intensive and legally cartelized industries, whereas it is less likely to persist in demand-volatile, R&D-intensive, and import-intensive industries. Copyright 2009 The Author 2009. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Associazione ICC. All rights reserved., Oxford University Press.

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  • Masatoshi Kato & Yuji Honjo, 2009. "The persistence of market leadership: evidence from Japan," Industrial and Corporate Change, Oxford University Press, vol. 18(6), pages 1107-1133, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:indcch:v:18:y:2009:i:6:p:1107-1133
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1093/icc/dtp012
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    Cited by:

    1. Susumu Cato & Ryoko Oki, 2012. "Leaders and competitors," Journal of Economics, Springer, pages 239-255.

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