IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/oup/ereveh/v16y2012i4p356-383.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Bondholders versus bond-sellers? Investment banks and conditionality lending in the London market for foreign government debt, 1815-1913

Author

Abstract

This paper offers a theory of conditionality lending in nineteenth-century international capital markets. We argue that ownership of reputation signals by prestigious banks rendered them able and willing to monitor government borrowing. Monitoring was a source of rent, and it led bankers to support countries facing liquidity crises in a manner similar to modern descriptions of 'relationship' lending to corporate clients by 'parent' banks. Prestigious bankers' ability to implement conditionality loans and monitor countries' financial policies also enabled them to deal with solvency. We find that, compared with prestigious bankers, bondholders' committees had neither the tools nor the prestige required for effectively dealing with defaulters. Hence such committees were far less important than previous research has claimed. Copyright , Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Marc Flandreau & Juan H. Flores, 2012. "Bondholders versus bond-sellers? Investment banks and conditionality lending in the London market for foreign government debt, 1815-1913," European Review of Economic History, Oxford University Press, vol. 16(4), pages 356-383, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:ereveh:v:16:y:2012:i:4:p:356-383
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1093/ereh/hes005
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Carola Frydman & Eric Hilt, 2014. "Investment Banks as Corporate Monitors in the Early 20th Century United States," NBER Working Papers 20544, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Marc Flandreau, 2013. "Sovereign states, bondholders committees, and the London Stock Exchange in the nineteenth century (1827–68): new facts and old fictions," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 29(4), pages 668-696, WINTER.
    3. Haytham Y.M. Ewaida, 2016. "The European Crisis Without End: The Consequences of European Monetary Integration," International Journal of Business and Social Research, LAR Center Press, vol. 6(8), pages 15-30, August.
    4. Haytham Y.M. Ewaida, 2016. "The European Crisis Without End: The Consequences of European Monetary Integration," International Journal of Business and Social Research, MIR Center for Socio-Economic Research, vol. 6(8), pages 15-30, August.
    5. Flores Zendejas, Juan, 2020. "Explaining latin america's persistent defaults: an analysis of debtor-creditor relations in London, 1822-1914," Working Papers unige:140134, University of Geneva, Paul Bairoch Institute of Economic History.
    6. Bradley, Michael & De Lira Salvatierra, Irving & Gulati, Mitu, 2014. "Lawyers: Gatekeepers of the sovereign debt market?," International Review of Law and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 38(S), pages 150-168.
    7. Ecchia, Stefania, 2016. "La controversia tra la Camera di Commercio di Roma e il Consiglio del Debito Pubblico Ottomano sulla conversione delle obbligazioni privilegiate del 1890 [The dispute between the Chamber of Commerc," MPRA Paper 72670, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Catão, Luis A.V. & Mano, Rui C., 2017. "Default premium," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 107(C), pages 91-110.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:oup:ereveh:v:16:y:2012:i:4:p:356-383. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Oxford University Press). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.