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Post-Keynesianism meets feminist economics

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  • Irene van Staveren

Abstract

This article explores the relationships between post-Keynesian economics and feminist economics. It distinguishes three key concepts in each tradition that recommend serious attention in the other tradition: gender, the household and unpaid work and caring as key concepts in feminist economics; uncertainty, market power and endogenous dynamics as core concepts in post-Keynesian economics. This article will show, with reference to the literature in which such cross-fertilisation has been explored already, how both traditions can be enriched from a stronger mutual engagement. Copyright The Author 2008. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Cambridge Political Economy Society. All rights reserved., Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Irene van Staveren, 2010. "Post-Keynesianism meets feminist economics," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 34(6), pages 1123-1144.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:cambje:v:34:y:2010:i:6:p:1123-1144
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1093/cje/ben033
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    Cited by:

    1. Dan Wheatley and Zhongmin Wu, 2011. "Work, Inequality, and the Dual Career Household," Working Papers 2011/03, Nottingham Trent University, Nottingham Business School, Economics Division.
    2. Hein, Eckhard, 2016. "Post-Keynesian macroeconomics since the mid-1990s: Main developments," IPE Working Papers 75/2016, Berlin School of Economics and Law, Institute for International Political Economy (IPE).

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