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Comerţul internaţional: de la monarhie la democraţie. O reconstrucţie sociologică


  • Apăvăloaei Matei Alexandru

    (Academia de Studii Economice din Bucureşti)


The implications political regimes upon trade policy are going to be praxeologically deduced and used in order to provide an alternative historical interpretation of protectionism and free trade throughout Western history, starting from the Middle Ages right up to the creation of the WTO/GATT. As the theory predicts, monarchy is prone to free trade, while democracy favors protectionism.

Suggested Citation

  • Apăvăloaei Matei Alexandru, 2011. "Comerţul internaţional: de la monarhie la democraţie. O reconstrucţie sociologică," Revista OEconomica, Romanian Society for Economic Science, Revista OEconomica, issue 02, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:oen:econom:y:2011:i:02:id:296

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Friedman, Milton, 1982. "Monetary Policy: Theory and Practice: A Reply," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 14(3), pages 404-406, August.
    2. Friedman, Milton & Schwartz, Anna J, 1969. "The Definition of Money: Net Wealth and Neutrality as Criteria," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 1(1), pages 1-14, February.
    3. Friedman, Milton, 1982. "Monetary Policy: Theory and Practice," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 14(1), pages 98-118, February.
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    More about this item


    trade policy; protectionism; monarchy; democracy; democratization; economic history; Austrian Economics;

    JEL classification:

    • B53 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - Current Heterodox Approaches - - - Austrian
    • B41 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - Economic Methodology - - - Economic Methodology
    • F13 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Trade Policy; International Trade Organizations
    • F59 - International Economics - - International Relations, National Security, and International Political Economy - - - Other
    • N40 - Economic History - - Government, War, Law, International Relations, and Regulation - - - General, International, or Comparative


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