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Producing a Citizens' Guide to the Budget: Why, What and How?


  • Murray Petrie
  • Jon Shields


As part of the growing search for more transparency and accountability in government finance, this article suggests guidelines for the production and dissemination of a citizens’ guide to the budget. Examples from a variety of countries help to illustrate why governments should publish an annual guide, what the contents and characteristics of a good guide should be, and how such a guide should be made accessible. JEL classification: H500, H600. Keywords: effective public accountability, transparent budgeting, open budgets, fiscal transparency, civil society, citizen participation, public oversight, public debate, access to information.

Suggested Citation

  • Murray Petrie & Jon Shields, 2010. "Producing a Citizens' Guide to the Budget: Why, What and How?," OECD Journal on Budgeting, OECD Publishing, vol. 10(2), pages 1-14.
  • Handle: RePEc:oec:govkaa:5km7gkwg2pjh

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Graciela L. Kaminsky & Carmen M. Reinhart & Carlos A. Végh, 2005. "When It Rains, It Pours: Procyclical Capital Flows and Macroeconomic Policies," NBER Chapters,in: NBER Macroeconomics Annual 2004, Volume 19, pages 11-82 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Canova, Fabio, 1998. "Detrending and business cycle facts," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(3), pages 475-512, May.
    3. Ricardo J. Caballero & Takeo Hoshi & Anil K. Kashyap, 2008. "Zombie Lending and Depressed Restructuring in Japan," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 98(5), pages 1943-1977, December.
    4. Ethan Ilzetzki & Carlos A. Vegh, 2008. "Procyclical Fiscal Policy in Developing Countries: Truth or Fiction?," NBER Working Papers 14191, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Rzońca, Andrzej & Ciżkowicz, Piotr, 2005. "Non-Keynesian effects of fiscal contraction in new member states," Working Paper Series 519, European Central Bank.
    6. Olivier Blanchard & Roberto Perotti, 2002. "An Empirical Characterization of the Dynamic Effects of Changes in Government Spending and Taxes on Output," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 117(4), pages 1329-1368.
    7. Gabriele Giudice & Alessandro Turrini & Jan in’t Veld, 2007. "Non-Keynesian Fiscal Adjustments? A Close Look at Expansionary Fiscal Consolidations in the EU," Open Economies Review, Springer, vol. 18(5), pages 613-630, November.
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    Cited by:

    1. White, Joseph, 2013. "Budget-makers and health care systems," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 112(3), pages 163-171.

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