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Long-Run Economic Growth and Policy: A Case about Mali

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  • Derek Stimel

Abstract

A short case about long-run economic growth issues in the African nation of Mali is presented. Issues discussed in the case include challenges related to Mali's education system, investment, and trade. Basic facts and statistics about Mali are provided. Analysis of public policy issues and the inherent challenge of extreme poverty are natural outgrowths of the case. The case serves as a foundation for in-class discussion or a take home assignment. The basic case objective is to add real-world context to what can often be a very technical presentation of growth issues. Though designed for a principles of macroeconomics course, the case would also be appropriate for a development course or an international economics course. In addition to the case itself, comments on preparation for teaching the case, conducting discussion related to the case, and possible assignments to go with the case are provided. Also, a brief motivation for using cases in principles of macroeconomics is provided.

Suggested Citation

  • Derek Stimel, 2010. "Long-Run Economic Growth and Policy: A Case about Mali," Journal for Economic Educators, Middle Tennessee State University, Business and Economic Research Center, vol. 10(2), pages 16-26, Fall.
  • Handle: RePEc:mts:jrnlee:v:10:y:2010:i:2:p:16-26
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    File URL: http://frank.mtsu.edu/~jee/2010/fall/3pp16to26_MS1409.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Sheryl B. Ball & Charles A. Holt, 1998. "Classroom Games: Speculation and Bubbles in an Asset Market," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 12(1), pages 207-218, Winter.
    2. Dwyer, Gerald P, Jr, et al, 1993. "Tests of Rational Expectations in a Stark Setting," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 103(418), pages 586-601, May.
    3. Ernst Fehr & Jean-Robert Tyran, 2005. "Individual Irrationality and Aggregate Outcomes," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, pages 43-66.
    4. Paul W. Grimes, 2002. "The Overconfident Principles of Economics Student: An Examination of a Metacognitive Skill," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 33(1), pages 15-30, January.
    5. Berg, Joyce E. & Nelson, Forrest D. & Rietz, Thomas A., 2008. "Prediction market accuracy in the long run," International Journal of Forecasting, Elsevier, vol. 24(2), pages 285-300.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    case; economic growth; productivity; Mali;

    JEL classification:

    • A20 - General Economics and Teaching - - Economic Education and Teaching of Economics - - - General
    • A22 - General Economics and Teaching - - Economic Education and Teaching of Economics - - - Undergraduate

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