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Turkish culture of migration: Flows between Turkey and Germany, socio-economic development and conflict

Author

Listed:
  • Ibrahim Sirkeci

    () (Regent's Centre for Transnational Studies, European Business School London, Regent's College London, United Kingdom)

  • Jeffrey H. Cohen

    () (Department of Sociology, University of Vienna, Austria.)

  • Pinar Yazgan

    () (Department of Sociology, Sakarya University, Sakarya, Turkey)

Abstract

In this paper we explore the rise of Turkey as a destination for new migrants including the children of Turks and Kurds who emigrated to Europe and Germany over the last five decades. An environment of social, economic and human insecurity dominated migration from Turkey to Europe and in particular Germany over the last five decades; and today, shifts in Turkish society, economy and security are attracting migrants to the country. Ethnic conflicts were one key factor driving migration in the past and as we note, they continue to moderate the relationship between socio-economic development and emigration rates for Kurdish movers in the present. Nevertheless, we argue that the growth of the Turkish economy and increasing social freedoms support an increase in immigration to Turkey. Immigration to Turkey includes returnees as well as second and third generation Turks from Germany among other places.

Suggested Citation

  • Ibrahim Sirkeci & Jeffrey H. Cohen & Pinar Yazgan, 2012. "Turkish culture of migration: Flows between Turkey and Germany, socio-economic development and conflict," Migration Letters, Transnational Press London, UK, vol. 9(1), pages 33-46, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:mig:journl:v:9:y:2012:i:1:p:33-46
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Ibrahim Sirkeci & Philip L. Martin, 2014. "Sources of Irregularity and Managing Migration: The Case of Turkey," Border Crossing, Transnational Press London, UK, vol. 4(1-2), pages 1-16, January.
    2. Ibrahim Sirkeci, 2017. "Turkey’s refugees, Syrians and refugees from Turkey: a country of insecurity," Migration Letters, Transnational Press London, UK, vol. 14(1), pages 127-144, January.
    3. Ibrahim Sirkeci & Neli Esipova, 2013. "Turkish migration in Europe and desire to migrate to and from Turkey," Border Crossing, Transnational Press London, UK, vol. 2013(1301), pages 1-13, January.
    4. Sinem Yilmaz, 2016. "Migration of highly educated Belgian and Dutch Turks: Young Brains of Turkey," Border Crossing, Transnational Press London, UK, vol. 6(2), pages 305-324, December.
    5. repec:mig:remrev:v:2:y:2017:i:1:p:31-45 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Ibrahim Sirkeci & Philip L. Martin, 2014. "Sources of Irregularity and Managing Migration: The Case of Turkey," Border Crossing, Transnational Press London, UK, vol. 2014(1401), pages 1-16, January.

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