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Do Global Risk Perceptions Play a Role in Emerging Market Equity Return Volatilities?

  • Erk Hacihasanoglu
  • F. N. Can Simga-Mugan
  • Ugur Soytas

This paper investigates whether global risk perceptions lead emerging market return volatilities. In so doing, we analyzed the period of interest in three parts to determine the effects of the changes in global risk perceptions on the volatility of emerging markets. We uncovered volatility spillover from risk perceptions to the MXEF returns before the crisis. Our results show that all the effects on emerging market volatilities are severed in 2008, during which MXEF follows a downward trend. However, we observe that volatility transmission emerges during the recovery period of MXEF again. Hence, risk perceptions should be considered while analyzing emerging markets.

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Article provided by M.E. Sharpe, Inc. in its journal Emerging Markets Finance and Trade.

Volume (Year): 48 (2012)
Issue (Month): 4 (July)
Pages: 67-78

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Handle: RePEc:mes:emfitr:v:48:y:2012:i:4:p:67-78
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