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Economic Performance of Human Capital in Post-Reform China

Author

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  • Kui-Wai Li
  • Lihong Yun
  • Gilbert C. S. Lui

Abstract

Provincial data are used to examine the economic performance of China's human capital, adjusted by mortality and interprovincial migration figures. The perpetual-inventory approach is used to compile China's human capital, which is further decomposed into skilled, unskilled, and different educational endowments. Statistical estimates are extended to the performance of four regions. The various human capital indicators are examined with different infrastructure variables. The empirical results show that human capital endowed with higher education is scarce across provinces, but skilled human capital can be improved by increasing the amount of secondary school education. Consideration of openness factors shows that foreign direct investment is complementary to the level of human capital endowed with higher education.

Suggested Citation

  • Kui-Wai Li & Lihong Yun & Gilbert C. S. Lui, 2009. "Economic Performance of Human Capital in Post-Reform China," Chinese Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 42(1), pages 40-61, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:mes:chinec:v:42:y:2009:i:1:p:40-61
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    Cited by:

    1. Zhou, Xianbo & Li, Kui-Wai & Li, Qin, 2011. "An analysis on technical efficiency in post-reform China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 22(3), pages 357-372, September.
    2. Simon Alder & Lin Shao & Fabrizio Zilibotti, 2012. "The Effect of Economic Reform and Industrial Policy in a Panel of Chinese Cities," DEGIT Conference Papers c017_061, DEGIT, Dynamics, Economic Growth, and International Trade.
    3. Simon Alder & Lin Shao & Fabrizio Zilibotti, 2016. "Economic reforms and industrial policy in a panel of Chinese cities," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 21(4), pages 305-349, December.
    4. Li, Kui-Wai & Liu, Tung, 2011. "Economic and productivity growth decomposition: An application to post-reform China," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 28(1-2), pages 366-373, January.
    5. Johansson, Anders C. & Wang, Xun, 2012. "Financial Sector Policies, Poverty and Inequality," Working Paper Series 2012-24, Stockholm School of Economics, China Economic Research Center.
    6. Liu, Tung & Li, Kui-Wai, 2012. "Analyzing China's productivity growth: Evidence from manufacturing industries," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 36(4), pages 531-551.
    7. Peng Bin, 2016. "Dynamic Development of Regional Disparity in Mainland China: An Experimental Study Based on a Multidimensional Index," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 8(12), pages 1-28, December.
    8. Li, Kui-Wai, 2009. "China's total factor productivity estimates by region, investment sources and ownership," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 33(3), pages 213-230, September.

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