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Voter Participation and the Redistributive State

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  • Greene, Kenneth V
  • Nikolaev, Oleg

Abstract

The redistributive theory of the state implies that voter participation rates should be highest among those who have the most to gain or lose or a V-shaped relationship between income and voting participation should exist. The authors use a data set that contains nearly 21,000 observations on individual survey responses about voting behavior in the United States between 1972 and 1993 to show that the participation rate generally rises monotonically with income, perhaps except at very high income levels. It does report other findings consistent with an economic theory of voting based on returns to association and with the hypothesis that public employees vote more. Copyright 1999 by Kluwer Academic Publishers

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  • Greene, Kenneth V & Nikolaev, Oleg, 1999. "Voter Participation and the Redistributive State," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 98(1-2), pages 213-226, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:pubcho:v:98:y:1999:i:1-2:p:213-26
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Schelling, Thomas C, 1969. "Models of Segregation," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 59(2), pages 488-493, May.
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    Cited by:

    1. Richard Cebula, 2001. "The electoral college and voter participation: Evidence on two hypotheses," Atlantic Economic Journal, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 29(3), pages 304-310, September.
    2. Dan Anderberg, 2007. "Inefficient households and the mix of government spending," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 131(1), pages 127-140, April.
    3. Richard Cebula & Franklin Mixon, 2012. "Dodging the vote?," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 42(1), pages 325-343, February.
    4. Cebula, Richard & McGrath, Richard & Paul, Chris, 2002. "A Cost Benefit Analysis of Voting," MPRA Paper 58430, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Eiji Yamamura, 2011. "Effects of social norms and fractionalization on voting behaviour in Japan," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 43(11), pages 1385-1398.
    6. Alois Stutzer & Lukas Kienast, 2005. "Demokratische Beteiligung und Staatsausgaben: Die Auswirkungen des Frauenstimmrechts," Swiss Journal of Economics and Statistics (SJES), Swiss Society of Economics and Statistics (SSES), vol. 141(IV), pages 617-650, December.
    7. Richard J. Cebula & Gordon Tullock, 2006. "An Extension of the Rational Voter Model," Chapters,in: The Elgar Companion to Public Economics, chapter 15 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    8. Stephen Drinkwater & Colin Jennings, 2007. "Who are the expressive voters?," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 132(1), pages 179-189, July.
    9. Richard Cebula, 2004. "Expressiveness and voting: Alternative evidence," Atlantic Economic Journal, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 32(3), pages 216-221, September.
    10. Richard J. Cebula & Garey C. Durden, 2007. "Expected Benefits of Voting and Voter Turnout," Working Papers 07-06, Department of Economics, Appalachian State University.
    11. Cebula, Richard & Lawson, Luther, 2002. "A Framework for Teaching the Rational Voter Model in Public Choice Courses," MPRA Paper 53183, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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