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Explaining the Vote for Slow Growth

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  • Richer, Jerrell

Abstract

A model of equilibrium rent determination is developed to incorporate both the scarcity and amenity effects associated with limits to new housing construction in a nonopen city where demand for housing has increased. Implications of the model are tested with data from California cities to determine which factors increase the probability that a local growth control ballot measure is proposed or passed. It is found that limits to new housing development occur with greater frequency in communities where fewer substitute cities exist and where certain socioeconomic characteristics predominate but not where current population densities or growth are high. Copyright 1995 by Kluwer Academic Publishers

Suggested Citation

  • Richer, Jerrell, 1995. "Explaining the Vote for Slow Growth," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 82(3-4), pages 207-223, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:pubcho:v:82:y:1995:i:3-4:p:207-23
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    Cited by:

    1. Katharina Schone & Wilfried Koch & Catherine Baumont, 2013. "Modeling local growth control decisions in a multi-city case: Do spatial interactions and lobbying efforts matter?," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 154(1), pages 95-117, January.
    2. Delattre, Laurence & Chanel, Olivier & Livenais, Cecile & Napoléone, Claude, 2015. "Combining discourse analyses to enrich theory: The case of local land-use policies in South Eastern France," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 113(C), pages 60-75.
    3. Dietz, Robert D. & Haurin, Donald R., 2003. "The social and private micro-level consequences of homeownership," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(3), pages 401-450, November.
    4. Olivier Chanel & Laurence Delattre & Claude Napoléone, 2014. "Determinants of Local Public Policies for Farmland Preservation and Urban Expansion: A French Illustration," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 90(3), pages 411-433.

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