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The First Word and the Last Word in the Budgetary Process: A Comparative Institutional Analysis of Proposal and Veto Authorities

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  • Dearden, James A
  • Schap, David

Abstract

This study examines the role of proposal authority and executive veto in the budgetary process. A five-stage sequential model of the budgetary process with three institutional actors--a legislature, an appropriations committee, and an executive--is presented. The authors examine (1) the factors that affect the executive's power in shaping the final budget when the executive is granted proposal authority; (2) how increased veto authority, in combination with executive proposal authority, affects the executive's power in forming the final budget; and (3) the effects of different types of proposal authority and veto rules on the efficiency of the budgetary process. Copyright 1994 by Kluwer Academic Publishers

Suggested Citation

  • Dearden, James A & Schap, David, 1994. "The First Word and the Last Word in the Budgetary Process: A Comparative Institutional Analysis of Proposal and Veto Authorities," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 81(1-2), pages 35-53, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:pubcho:v:81:y:1994:i:1-2:p:35-53
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    1. Levitt, Steven D, 1994. "Using Repeat Challengers to Estimate the Effect of Campaign Spending on Election Outcomes in the U.S. House," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 102(4), pages 777-798, August.
    2. Jones, Philip & Hudson, John, 1996. "Standardization and the costs of assessing quality," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 12(2), pages 355-361, September.
    3. Jones, Philip & Hudson, John, 1996. "The Quality of Political Leadership: A Case Study of John Major," British Journal of Political Science, Cambridge University Press, vol. 26(02), pages 229-244, April.
    4. Wittman, Donald, 1989. "Why Democracies Produce Efficient Results," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 97(6), pages 1395-1424, December.
    5. Eggertsson,Thrainn, 1990. "Economic Behavior and Institutions," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521348911, March.
    6. Schram, Arthur & Sonnemans, Joep, 1996. "Why people vote: Experimental evidence," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 17(4), pages 417-442, August.
    7. Maute, Manfred F. & Forrester, William Jr., 1991. "The effect of attribute qualities on consumer decision making: a causal model of external information search," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 12(4), pages 643-666, December.
    8. George J. Stigler, 1961. "The Economics of Information," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 69, pages 213-213.
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    Cited by:

    1. Moser, Peter, 1999. "The impact of legislative institutions on public policy: a survey," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 15(1), pages 1-33, March.

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