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The Evolution of Free-Lance Music Composition, 1650–1900

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  • F. Scherer

Abstract

Using qualitative histories and coded data on 645 composers born between 1650and 1849, this article traces the evolution of free-lance activity by musiccomposers over the course of two centuries. Contrary to widely advancedsuppositions, many composers were pursuing free-lance composition as the 17thcentury ended, although more for opera than instrumental music writing. Fromthat time on, free-lance composition expanded steadily, replacing employmentby the church and the nobility. A growing number of composers also acted asimpresarios in organizing their own opera or concert performances. Composersearned their bread in many other ways too. There were clear rising trends intheir employment as private orchestra directors and conservatory professors. Copyright Kluwer Academic Publishers 2001

Suggested Citation

  • F. Scherer, 2001. "The Evolution of Free-Lance Music Composition, 1650–1900," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 25(4), pages 307-319, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:jculte:v:25:y:2001:i:4:p:307-319
    DOI: 10.1023/A:1017983532237
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1023/A:1017983532237
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Borowiecki, Karol Jan, 2013. "Geographic clustering and productivity: An instrumental variable approach for classical composers," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 73(1), pages 94-110.
    2. Karol J Borowiecki, 2015. "Agglomeration economies in classical music," Papers in Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 94(3), pages 443-468, August.
    3. Oliver Falck & Michael Fritsch & Stephan Heblich & Anne Otto, 2015. "Music in the Air: Estimating the Social Return to Cultural Amenities," CESifo Working Paper Series 5183, CESifo Group Munich.
    4. Achten-Gozdowski, Jennifer, 2018. "Geschichte und Politökonomie deutscher Theatersubventionen
      [History and Political Economy of Public Subsidies for German Theatres and Operas]
      ," MPRA Paper 85087, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Andreas Wagener, 2012. "Why Do People (Not) Cough in Concerts? The Economics of Concert Etiquette," ACEI Working Paper Series AWP-05-2012, Association for Cultural Economics International, revised Dec 2012.

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