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Do Economic Inequalities Harm Health? Evidence from Europe

Author

Listed:
  • Jean-Michel Etienne

    (Université Panthéon-Assas)

  • Ali Skalli

    () (Université Panthéon-Assas)

  • Ioannis Theodossiou

    (University of Aberdeen)

Abstract

Using the European Community Household Panel (1994-2001), random effects models are estimated to assess the effect of income inequality on individuals' health. The individual's health status is measured by self assessment responses and by relatively objective measures of health. Country-level inequality measures are used after controlling for regional fixed effects. This implies that country level factors are the relevant approximations of individuals' reference groups. The results suggest that income inequality harms not only the health of the least well off but also the health of all individuals regardless of their position in the income distribution.

Suggested Citation

  • Jean-Michel Etienne & Ali Skalli & Ioannis Theodossiou, 2011. "Do Economic Inequalities Harm Health? Evidence from Europe," Journal of Income Distribution, Journal of Income Distribution, vol. 20(3-4), pages 57-74, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:jid:journl:y:2011:v:20:i:3-4:p:57-74
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    Cited by:

    1. Herzer, Dierk & Nunnenkamp, Peter, 2015. "Income inequality and health: Evidence from developed and developing countries," Economics - The Open-Access, Open-Assessment E-Journal, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW), vol. 9, pages 1-56.
    2. Herzer, Dierk & Nunnenkamp, Peter, 2011. "Income inequality and health: New evidence from panel data," Kiel Working Papers 1736, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
    3. S.A. Drakopoulos & E. Lakioti & I. Theodossiou, 2011. "Childhood socioeconomic deprivation and later adulthood health," International Journal of Social Economics, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 38(1), pages 23-38, January.
    4. Nicole Grunewald & Inmaculada Martínez-Zarzoso, 2014. "Green Growth in Mexico, Brazil and Chile: Policy strategies and future prospects," Ibero America Institute for Econ. Research (IAI) Discussion Papers 229, Ibero-America Institute for Economic Research.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    income inequality; health status; random effects;

    JEL classification:

    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior
    • D63 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Equity, Justice, Inequality, and Other Normative Criteria and Measurement

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