IDEAS home Printed from
   My bibliography  Save this article

An Estimation of Elasticities of Consumption Demand and Investment Demand for Owner-Occupied Housing in Taiwan : A Two-Period Model




Buying a house usually satisfies housing consumption demand and housing investment demand, simultaneously. In order to disentangle the above two types of demand, households, in this study, are separated into three subtenure groups i.e. renters, owners owning one house, and owners buying a second or more houses. Presumably, renting a house is for consumption only, while buying a second house is usually for investment purposes. Applying a two-period model and two data sets from DGBAS and from Land Bank of Taiwan, the estimated results are as follows: Firstly, the income elasticity of pure consumption demand for housing is very close to unity (1.0413). Secondly, the income elasticity for a pure investment demand is greater than one (1.2643). Finally, for a household owning only one house, the shares for consumption motive and for investment motive are 26% and 74%, respectively.

Suggested Citation

  • Chu-Chia Lin & Sue-Jing Lin, 1999. "An Estimation of Elasticities of Consumption Demand and Investment Demand for Owner-Occupied Housing in Taiwan : A Two-Period Model," International Real Estate Review, Asian Real Estate Society, vol. 2(1), pages 110-125.
  • Handle: RePEc:ire:issued:v:02:n:01:1999:p:110-125

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL:
    File Function: Full text
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Garber, Peter M, 1990. "Famous First Bubbles," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 4(2), pages 35-54, Spring.
    2. Manuel Gottlieb, 1976. "Long Swings in Urban Development," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number gott76-1, January.
    3. DiPasquale Denise & Wheaton William C., 1994. "Housing Market Dynamics and the Future of Housing Prices," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 35(1), pages 1-27, January.
    4. Clapp John M. & Giaccotto Carmelo, 1994. "The Influence of Economic Variables on Local House Price Dynamics," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 36(2), pages 161-183, September.
    5. Smith, Lawrence B. & Ho, Michael H. C., 1996. "The Relative Price Differential between Higher and Lower Priced Homes," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 5(1), pages 1-17, March.
    6. Karl E. Case & Robert J. Shiller, 1990. "Forecasting Prices and Excess Returns in the Housing Market," Real Estate Economics, American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association, vol. 18(3), pages 253-273.
    7. Hali J. Edison & Pongsak Luangaram & Marcus Miller, 1998. "Asset bubbles, domino effects and 'lifeboats': elements of the East Asian crisis," International Finance Discussion Papers 606, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)


    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.

    Cited by:

    1. Wen-chieh Wu & Sue-Jing Lin, 2002. "Housing Demand with Random Group Effects," International Real Estate Review, Asian Real Estate Society, vol. 5(1), pages 133-145.
    2. Hanna Augustyniak & Jacek Łaszek & Krzysztof Olszewski & Joanna Waszczuk, 2013. "Housing market cycles – a disequilibrium model and its application to the primary housing market in Warsaw," Ekonomia journal, Faculty of Economic Sciences, University of Warsaw, vol. 35.
    3. Antipa, P. & Schalck, C., 2009. "Impact of Fiscal Policy on Residential Investment in France," Working papers 270, Banque de France.

    More about this item


    Consumption demand; investment demand; elasticity and housing; Taiwan;

    JEL classification:

    • L85 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Services - - - Real Estate Services


    Access and download statistics


    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ire:issued:v:02:n:01:1999:p:110-125. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (IRER Secretary Office/Webmaster). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.