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The Problems of Accounting in a Public Institution: The Case of Slovenia


  • Meta Duhovnik

    (Slovenian Institute of Auditors, Ljubljana, Slovenia)


In the article the author determines that, due to changes during the privatisation process, the Slovenian framework for public institution accounting is unable to assure the relevant presentation of costs, benefits and effects. She therefore proposes certain changes based on solutions applied in the private sector accounting practices. Her conclusions and recommendations, however, are based on a need for a true and fair measurement of a public institution’s results. The recommended way to achieve this goal is the proper application of solutions included in the International Public Sector Accounting Standards issued by the International Public Sector Accounting Standards Board of the International Federation of Accountants.

Suggested Citation

  • Meta Duhovnik, 2007. "The Problems of Accounting in a Public Institution: The Case of Slovenia," Financial Theory and Practice, Institute of Public Finance, vol. 31(4), pages 421-445.
  • Handle: RePEc:ipf:finteo:v:31:y:2007:i:4:p:421-445

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Bessembinder, Hendrik, 1991. "Forward Contracts and Firm Value: Investment Incentive and Contracting Effects," Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis, Cambridge University Press, vol. 26(04), pages 519-532, December.
    2. Takeo Hoshi & Anil Kashyap & David Scharfstein, 1991. "Corporate Structure, Liquidity, and Investment: Evidence from Japanese Industrial Groups," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 106(1), pages 33-60.
    3. J. David Cummins & Richard D. Phillips & Stephen D. Smith, 1997. "Derivatives and corporate risk management: participation and volume decisions in the insurance industry," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 97-12, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
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    More about this item


    public institution; benefits; costs; effects; Accounting Act; Slovenian Accounting Standards; International Public Sector Accounting Standards; accrual principle;

    JEL classification:

    • M41 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Accounting - - - Accounting
    • P36 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Institutions and Their Transitions - - - Consumer Economics; Health; Education and Training; Welfare, Income, Wealth, and Poverty
    • L31 - Industrial Organization - - Nonprofit Organizations and Public Enterprise - - - Nonprofit Institutions; NGOs; Social Entrepreneurship


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