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The siena microsimulation model (sm2) for net-gross conversion of eu-silc income variables

Author

Listed:
  • Gianni Betti

    () (University of Siena, P.zza S. Francesco, 7, 53100 Siena, Italy)

  • Gabriella Donatiello

    () (ISTAT, Via RavĂ , 150, 00142 Roma, Italy)

  • Vijay Verma

    () (University of Siena, P.zza S. Francesco, 7, 53100 Siena, Italy)

Abstract

In interview surveys collecting information on personal income, the respondents may report income amounts as gross or net of taxes and other deductions. These data must be made homogenous before use for analysis, especially when undertaking comparisons across population groups and countries. The Siena Microsimulation Model (SM2) has been developed as a practical tool providing a robust and convenient procedure for the conversion between net and gross forms of household income. In this paper we describe the logic and structure of the SM2. Starting from data on household and personal income given in different forms, and on the basis of the prevailing tax regime in a country, the SAS routines of the model are designed to estimate full information on income by component, with a breakdown of gross amounts into taxes, social insurance contributions of various types, and net income. Given this specific purpose, SM2 is not meant to be an alternative to general tax-benefit simulation models, but as a complementary tool which those models can usefully exploit. The usefulness of SM2, of course, goes beyond these specific objectives. The distinguishing feature of SM2 is that it can handle diverse tax-benefit regimes using a common logic and a standard set of procedures making it particularly useful for multi-country comparative application; these are explained in the paper in some detail. The immediate context for the development of SM2 has been the requirements of EU-SILC (EU Statistics on Income and Living Conditions). Recently SM2 has been implemented for Italy based on EU-SILC data. The application and some results from it are described. Applications have also been developed for France, Spain and Greece. Selected aspects of these applications are illustrated for France and Spain.

Suggested Citation

  • Gianni Betti & Gabriella Donatiello & Vijay Verma, 2011. "The siena microsimulation model (sm2) for net-gross conversion of eu-silc income variables," International Journal of Microsimulation, International Microsimulation Association, vol. 4(1), pages 35-53.
  • Handle: RePEc:ijm:journl:v:4:y:2011:i:1:p:35-53
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Paolo Consolini & Gabriella Donatiello, 2015. "Multi-source data collection strategy and microsimulation techniques for the Italian EU-SILC," Rivista di statistica ufficiale, ISTAT - Italian National Institute of Statistics - (Rome, ITALY), vol. 17(2), pages 77-96.
    2. Andrea Albarea & Michele Bernasconi & Cinzia Di Novi & Anna Marenzi & Dino Rizzi & Francesca Zantomio, 2015. "Accounting for Tax Evasion Profiles and Tax Expenditures in Microsimulation Modelling. The BETAMOD Model for Personal Income Taxes in Italy," International Journal of Microsimulation, International Microsimulation Association, vol. 8(3), pages 99-136.
    3. Lidia Ceriani & Carlo V. Fiorio & Chiara Gigliarano, 2013. "The importance of choosing the data set for tax-benefit analysis," International Journal of Microsimulation, International Microsimulation Association, vol. 1(6), pages 86-121.
    4. Gabriella Donatiello & Gianni Betti & Paolo Consolini, 2012. "The Construction of Gross Income Variables of Eusilc (Eu Statistics on Income and Living Conditions) in Italy: A Mixed Strategy Using Microsimulation and Administrative Data," Department of Economics University of Siena 652, Department of Economics, University of Siena.
    5. Fernando Di Nicola & Giorgio Mongelli & Simone Pellegrino, 2015. "The static microsimulation model of the Italian Department of Finance: Structure and first results regarding income and housing taxation," ECONOMIA PUBBLICA, FrancoAngeli Editore, vol. 2015(2), pages 125-157.
    6. Zhu, Junyi, 2015. "Bracket creep revisited - with and without r>g: Evidence from Germany," Discussion Papers 37/2015, Deutsche Bundesbank.
    7. Figari, Francesco & Paulus, Alari & Sutherland, Holly, 2014. "Microsimulation and policy analysis," ISER Working Paper Series 2014-23, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    8. Flores Unzaga, Ismael Martin & Zhu, Junyi, 2014. "Bracket Creep Revisited: Progressivity and a Solution by Adjusting the Rich Tax in Germany," MPRA Paper 57664, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    9. Ana Kreter & Gianni Betti & Renata Del-Vecchio & Jefferson Staduto, 2015. "The Siena Micro-Simulation Model (SM2): a contribution for informality studies in Brazil," Quality & Quantity: International Journal of Methodology, Springer, vol. 49(6), pages 2251-2268, November.
    10. Flores Unzaga, Ismael Martin & Zhu, Junyi, 2014. "Bracket Creep Revisited: Progressivity and a Solution by Adjusting the Rich Tax in Germany," EconStor Preprints 100006, ZBW - German National Library of Economics.
    11. Maria Cozzolino & Marco Di Marco, 2015. "Micromodelling Italian Taxes and Social Policies," Rivista di statistica ufficiale, ISTAT - Italian National Institute of Statistics - (Rome, ITALY), vol. 17(2), pages 17-26.

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