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Virtual Immersion Applications For Improving The Educational System



    () (University POLITEHNICA of Bucharest, Splaiul Independentei, 313, sector 6, Bucharest, 060042, Romania)

  • Mihalache GHINEA

    (University POLITEHNICA of Bucharest, Splaiul Independentei, 313, sector 6, Bucharest, 060042, Romania)


The virtual immersion has captured the attention of many researchers, regardless of their activity domains or industry. Nowadays, the virtual reality could have promising implications for the future of education. Despite the fact that this technology is most often met in the entertainment and marketing industry, it began to gain attention of scholars as well. This paper presents the role of virtual immersion in education, its implication and the applications in/through the educational software. The level of immersion that VR provides is the reason that makes it promising for the future of e-learning. Learners become fully engaged, and this makes the learning experience more interactive and entertaining. This helps them assimilate information at ease. This technology can also support children by designing 3D characters in activity books, and hence the stimulation of children’s intellect and senses, as well. The TIMV 3D, is a platform proposed by the team of AVRENG Lab. from University POLITEHNICA of Bucharest. It is a flexible and interactive instrument that can be used in any educational activity. The role-playing enabled by the platform in case is part of gamification, the very trendy approach in what the actual digital generation is concerned.

Suggested Citation

  • Anca MARINICA (STAN) & Mihalache GHINEA, 2017. "Virtual Immersion Applications For Improving The Educational System," International Conference on Economic Sciences and Business Administration, Spiru Haret University, vol. 4(1), pages 272-279, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:icb:wpaper:v:4:y:2017:i:1:272-279

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Hoesli, Martin & Oikarinen, Elias, 2012. "Are REITs real estate? Evidence from international sector level data," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 31(7), pages 1823-1850.
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    3. Alexander, Gordon J. & Baptista, Alexandre M., 2002. "Economic implications of using a mean-VaR model for portfolio selection: A comparison with mean-variance analysis," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 26(7-8), pages 1159-1193, July.
    4. Clayton, Jim & MacKinnon, Greg, 2003. "The Relative Importance of Stock, Bond and Real Estate Factors in Explaining REIT Returns," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 27(1), pages 39-60, July.
    5. Carolina Fugazza & Massimo Guidolin & Giovanna Nicodano, 2007. "Investing for the Long-run in European Real Estate," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 34(1), pages 35-80, January.
    6. Elias Oikarinen & Martin Hoesli & Camilo Serrano, 2011. "The Long-Run Dynamics between Direct and Securitized Real Estate," Journal of Real Estate Research, American Real Estate Society, vol. 33(1), pages 73-104.
    7. Haim Levy, 1992. "Stochastic Dominance and Expected Utility: Survey and Analysis," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 38(4), pages 555-593, April.
    8. repec:arz:wpaper:eres2012-232 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Westerheide, Peter, 2006. "Cointegration of real estate stocks and REITs with common stocks, bonds and consumer price inflation: an international comparison," ZEW Discussion Papers 06-057, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
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    More about this item


    virtual reality; immersion; e-learning; education; technology;

    JEL classification:

    • C61 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - Optimization Techniques; Programming Models; Dynamic Analysis
    • C88 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Data Collection and Data Estimation Methodology; Computer Programs - - - Other Computer Software
    • I2 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education


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