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Urban Vulnerability in Bantul District, Indonesia—Towards Safer and Sustainable Development

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  • Dyah R. Hizbaron

    () (Department of Environmental Geography, Faculty of Geography, Gadjah Mada University—Sekip Utara, Bulaksumur, Yogyakarta 55281, Indonesia)

  • Muhammad Baiquni

    () (Department of Regional Development, Faculty of Geography, Gadjah Mada University—Sekip Utara, Bulaksumur, Yogyakarta 55281, Indonesia)

  • Junun Sartohadi

    () (Department of Environmental Geography, Faculty of Geography, Gadjah Mada University—Sekip Utara, Bulaksumur, Yogyakarta 55281, Indonesia)

  • R. Rijanta

    () (Department of Regional Development, Faculty of Geography, Gadjah Mada University—Sekip Utara, Bulaksumur, Yogyakarta 55281, Indonesia)

Abstract

Assuring safer and sustainable development in seismic prone areas requires predictive measurements, i.e ., hazard, vulnerability and risk assessment. This research aims to assess urban vulnerability due to seismic hazard through a risk based spatial plan. The idea is to indicate current and future potential losses due to specified hazards with given spatial and temporal units. Herein, urban vulnerability refers to the classic separation between social and physical vulnerability assessments. The research area covers six sub-districts in Bantul, Indonesia. It experienced 6.2 Mw earthquakes on May, 27th, 2006 and suffered a death toll of 5700, economic losses of up to 3.1 billion US$ and damage to nearly 80% of a 508 km 2 area. The research area experienced the following regional issues: (1) seismic hazard; (2) rapid land conversion and (3) domination of low-income group. This research employs spatial multi criteria evaluations (SMCE) for social vulnerability (SMCE-SV) and for physical vulnerability (SMCE-PV). The research reveals that (1) SMCE-SV and SMCE-PV are empirically possible to indicate the urban vulnerability indices; and (2) integrating the urban vulnerability assessment into a spatial plan requires strategic, technical, substantial and procedural integration. In summary, without adequate knowledge and political support, any manifestation towards safer and sustainable development will remain meager and haphazard.

Suggested Citation

  • Dyah R. Hizbaron & Muhammad Baiquni & Junun Sartohadi & R. Rijanta, 2012. "Urban Vulnerability in Bantul District, Indonesia—Towards Safer and Sustainable Development," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 4(9), pages 1-16, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:gam:jsusta:v:4:y:2012:i:9:p:2022-2037:d:19798
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Dennis Mileti & Julie Gailus, 2005. "Sustainable Development And Hazards Mitigation In The United States: Disasters By Design Revisited," Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change, Springer, vol. 10(3), pages 491-504, July.
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    Cited by:

    1. Yi Ge & Haibo Zhang & Wen Dou & Wenfang Chen & Ning Liu & Yuan Wang & Yulin Shi & Wenxin Rao, 2017. "Mapping Social Vulnerability to Air Pollution: A Case Study of the Yangtze River Delta Region, China," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 9(1), pages 1-15, January.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    vulnerability; sustainability; spatial plan; seismic hazard; Indonesia;

    JEL classification:

    • Q - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics
    • Q0 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - General
    • Q2 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation
    • Q3 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Nonrenewable Resources and Conservation
    • Q5 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics
    • Q56 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environment and Development; Environment and Trade; Sustainability; Environmental Accounts and Accounting; Environmental Equity; Population Growth
    • O13 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Agriculture; Natural Resources; Environment; Other Primary Products

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