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Global Mining and the Uneasy Neoliberalization of Sustainable Development

Author

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  • Matthew Himley

    () (Department of Geography-Geology, Illinois State University, Campus Box 4400, Normal, IL 61790, USA)

Abstract

As transnational mining firms have sought to position themselves as drivers of sustainable development, a key component of their efforts has been the implementation of social development programs in their areas of operation. This paper situates the expansion of corporate-led development in the mining sector as part of an ongoing reconfiguration of the frameworks and processes through which mineral production is governed, interpreting such initiatives as illustrative of “roll-out” neoliberalization. Based on an analysis of firm-led development at the Pierina gold mine in Andean Peru, I explore how the mining company has been able to advance a version of sustainability broadly compatible with contemporary large-scale mining. Taking on the role of development agent, however, is not an uncomplicated endeavor in that it has left the firm subject to escalating development claims from nearby populations. In this context, I raise the question of whether the mining industry’s adoption of notions of partnership and participation amounts to a strategy for diffusing responsibility when necessary and deflecting the claims of affected communities.

Suggested Citation

  • Matthew Himley, 2010. "Global Mining and the Uneasy Neoliberalization of Sustainable Development," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 2(10), pages 1-21, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:gam:jsusta:v:2:y:2010:i:10:p:3270-3290:d:9891
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. repec:gam:jsusta:v:10:y:2018:i:3:p:723-:d:135017 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Andreucci, Diego & Kallis, Giorgos, 2017. "Governmentality, Development and the Violence of Natural Resource Extraction in Peru," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 134(C), pages 95-103.
    3. repec:eee:jrpoli:v:54:y:2017:i:c:p:25-42 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. repec:gam:jsusta:v:10:y:2018:i:2:p:504-:d:131777 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Tang-Lee, Diane, 2016. "Corporate social responsibility (CSR) and public engagement for a Chinese state-backed mining project in Myanmar – Challenges and prospects," Resources Policy, Elsevier, vol. 47(C), pages 28-37.
    6. Warnaars, Ximena S., 2012. "Why be poor when we can be rich? Constructing responsible mining in El Pangui, Ecuador," Resources Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(2), pages 223-232.
    7. Jian Peng & Minli Zong & Yi'na Hu & Yanxu Liu & Jiansheng Wu, 2015. "Assessing Landscape Ecological Risk in a Mining City: A Case Study in Liaoyuan City, China," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 7(7), pages 1-23, June.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    mining; Peru; community development; resource governance; neoliberalization;

    JEL classification:

    • Q - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics
    • Q0 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - General
    • Q2 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation
    • Q3 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Nonrenewable Resources and Conservation
    • Q5 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics
    • Q56 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environment and Development; Environment and Trade; Sustainability; Environmental Accounts and Accounting; Environmental Equity; Population Growth
    • O13 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Agriculture; Natural Resources; Environment; Other Primary Products

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