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Pinto Beans ( Phaseolus vulgaris L.) as a Functional Food: Implications on Human Health

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  • Cristiane R. S. Câmara

    () (Department of Food Science and Technology, 143 Filley Hall—East Campus, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68583, USA)

  • Carlos A. Urrea

    () (Department of Agronomy and Horticulture, 4502 Ave I Panhandle Research Extension Center, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Scottsbluff, NE 69361, USA)

  • Vicki Schlegel

    () (Department of Food Science and Technology, 143 Filley Hall—East Campus, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68583, USA)

Abstract

Most foods are considered functional in terms of providing nutrients and energy to sustain daily life, but dietary systems that are capable of preventing or remediating a stressed or diseased state are classified as functional foods. Dry beans ( Phaseolus vulgaris L.) contain high levels of chemically diverse components (phenols, resistance starch, vitamins, fructooligosaccharides) that have shown to protect against such conditions as oxidative stress, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and many types of cancer, thereby positioning this legume as an excellent functional food. Moreover, the United States has a rich dry bean history and is currently a top producer of dry beans in the world with pinto beans accounting for the vast majority. Despite these attributes, dry bean consumption in the US remains relatively low. Therefore, the objective of this manuscript is to review dry beans as an important US agricultural crop and as functional food for the present age with an emphasis on pinto beans.

Suggested Citation

  • Cristiane R. S. Câmara & Carlos A. Urrea & Vicki Schlegel, 2013. "Pinto Beans ( Phaseolus vulgaris L.) as a Functional Food: Implications on Human Health," Agriculture, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 3(1), pages 1-22, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:gam:jagris:v:3:y:2013:i:1:p:90-111:d:23735
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    pinto beans; dry beans; functional food; phenolic compounds; legumes; nutraceuticals;

    JEL classification:

    • Q1 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture
    • Q10 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - General
    • Q11 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Aggregate Supply and Demand Analysis; Prices
    • Q12 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Micro Analysis of Farm Firms, Farm Households, and Farm Input Markets
    • Q13 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Agricultural Markets and Marketing; Cooperatives; Agribusiness
    • Q14 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Agricultural Finance
    • Q15 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Land Ownership and Tenure; Land Reform; Land Use; Irrigation; Agriculture and Environment
    • Q16 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - R&D; Agricultural Technology; Biofuels; Agricultural Extension Services
    • Q17 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Agriculture in International Trade
    • Q18 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Agricultural Policy; Food Policy

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