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Monetary policy report to the Congress, July 18, 2001


  • anonymous


The weakness in the economy that emerged late last year has become more persistent and widespread. In response, the FOMC has lowered the target federal funds rate six times this year, for a cumulative total reduction of 2-3/4 percentage points. A number of factors account for this unusually steep reduction in the federal funds rate, including the magnitude and rapidity of the slowdown and the need to offset a stronger dollar and lower equity prices. At midyear the information available for the recent performance of both the U.S. economy and some of our key trading partners remains somewhat downbeat, on balance. Nonetheless, a number of factors are in place that should set the stage for stronger growth later this year and in 2002. Moreover, the outlook for productivity growth over the longer run remains favorable.

Suggested Citation

  • anonymous, 2001. "Monetary policy report to the Congress, July 18, 2001," Federal Reserve Bulletin, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.), issue Aug, pages 501-527.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedgrb:y:2001:i:aug:p:501-527:n:v.87no.8

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. David B. Gordon & Ross Levine, 1988. "The capital flight "problem."," International Finance Discussion Papers 320, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    2. Steven B. Kamin & Robert B. Kahn & Ross Levine, 1989. "External debt and developing country growth," International Finance Discussion Papers 352, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
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    Cited by:

    1. Guillermo Gigliani, 2014. "The Reform of the Federal Reserve in 2008: Is the Money Supply Endogenous or Exogenous?," Ensayos Económicos, Central Bank of Argentina, Economic Research Department, vol. 1(71), pages 73-94, December.
    2. Aoki, Kosuke & Proudman, James & Vlieghe, Gertjan, 2004. "House prices, consumption, and monetary policy: a financial accelerator approach," Journal of Financial Intermediation, Elsevier, vol. 13(4), pages 414-435, October.
    3. Jesús Clemente & María Dolores Gadea & Antonio Montañés & Marcelo Reyes, 2017. "Structural Breaks, Inflation and Interest Rates: Evidence from the G7 Countries," Econometrics, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 5(1), pages 1-17, February.
    4. Dawid Johannes van Lill, 2017. "Changes in the Liquidity Effect Over Time: Evidence from Four Monetary Policy Regimes," Working Papers 704, Economic Research Southern Africa.
    5. Mukesh Khanal, 2011. "Monetary Neutrality in the Nepalese Economy during 1975-2008," Working Papers id:4647, eSocialSciences.
    6. repec:agr:journl:v:4(613):y:2017:i:4(613):p:137-160 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Jiménez Polanco, Miguel Alejandro & Lopez Hawa, Nabil, 2014. "Heterogeneidad y Racionalidad en las Expectativas de Inflación: Evidencia desagregada para República Dominicana
      [Heterogeneity and Rationality of Inflation Expectations: Disaggregated Evidence for
      ," MPRA Paper 75912, University Library of Munich, Germany.


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