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  • Richard Layte

    (The Economic and Social Research Institute, Dublin and Trinity College Dublin, Ireland)

  • Helen Russell

    (The Economic and Social Research Institute, Dublin, Ireland)


This special issue of the Economic and Social Review draws upon four papers originally presented at the 2015 research conference of the Growing Up in Ireland study (GUI), the longitudinal study of children in Ireland. Although there can be few readers of Economic and Social Review in Ireland who are not aware of GUI, it is still worth providing some detail on the origin and structure of the study as it is the largest social survey ever undertaken in Ireland.

Suggested Citation

  • Richard Layte & Helen Russell, 2016. "Introduction," The Economic and Social Review, Economic and Social Studies, vol. 47(4), pages 447-450.
  • Handle: RePEc:eso:journl:v:47:y:2016:i:4:p:447-450

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Erdal Tekin & Chandler McClellan & Karen Jean Minyard, 2013. "Health and Health Behaviors during the Worst of Times," NBER Working Papers 19234, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Cutler, David M. & Lange, Fabian & Meara, Ellen & Richards-Shubik, Seth & Ruhm, Christopher J., 2011. "Rising educational gradients in mortality: The role of behavioral risk factors," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(6), pages 1174-1187.
    3. Wilkinson, Richard G & Pickett, Kate E., 2006. "Income inequality and population health: A review and explanation of the evidence," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 62(7), pages 1768-1784, April.
    4. Leigh, Andrew & Jencks, Christopher, 2007. "Inequality and mortality: Long-run evidence from a panel of countries," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 26(1), pages 1-24, January.
    5. Svensson, Mikael, 2007. "Do not go breaking your heart: Do economic upturns really increase heart attack mortality?," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 65(4), pages 833-841, August.
    6. McInerney, Melissa & Mellor, Jennifer M., 2012. "Recessions and seniors’ health, health behaviors, and healthcare use: Analysis of the Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 31(5), pages 744-751.
    7. Christopher J. Ruhm, 2000. "Are Recessions Good for Your Health?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 115(2), pages 617-650.
    8. Yang, Tse-Chuan & Chen, Vivian Yi-Ju & Shoff, Carla & Matthews, Stephen A., 2012. "Using quantile regression to examine the effects of inequality across the mortality distribution in the U.S. counties," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 74(12), pages 1900-1910.
    9. Ruhm, Christopher J., 2003. "Good times make you sick," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(4), pages 637-658, July.
    10. Tekin, Erdal & McClellan, Chandler & Minyard, Karen Jean, 2013. "Health and Health Behaviors during the Worst of Times: Evidence from the Great Recession," IZA Discussion Papers 7538, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    11. E. Calvert & Brian Nolan & Tony Fahey & D. Healy & A. Mulcahy & B. Maître & Michelle Norris & I. O’Donnell & Nessa Winston & Christopher Whelan, 2013. "GINI Country Report: Growing Inequalities and their Impacts in Ireland," GINI Country Reports ireland, AIAS, Amsterdam Institute for Advanced Labour Studies.
    12. Neumayer, Eric, 2004. "Recessions lower (some) mortality rates:: evidence from Germany," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 58(6), pages 1037-1047, March.
    13. Leclerc, Annette & Chastang, Jean-François & Menvielle, Gwenn & Luce, Danièle, 2006. "Socioeconomic inequalities in premature mortality in France: Have they widened in recent decades?," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 62(8), pages 2035-2045, April.
    14. Audrey Laporte, 2004. "Do economic cycles have a permanent effect on population health? Revisiting the Brenner hypothesis," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 13(8), pages 767-779.
    15. Ruhm, Christopher J., 2015. "Recessions, healthy no more?," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 17-28.
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    Cited by:

    1. Braun, Benjamin, 2016. "Speaking to the people? Money, trust, and central bank legitimacy in the age of quantitative easing," MPIfG Discussion Paper 16/12, Max Planck Institute for the Study of Societies.
    2. A. Mitchell Polinsky, 2017. "Prison Work Programs in a Model of Deterrence," American Law and Economics Review, Oxford University Press, vol. 19(2), pages 391-422.


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