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Green Economy, Red Herring


  • Clive L. Spash


This year sees Rio plus 20 years and much activity especially from United Nations (UN) related institutions to push forward various agendas which the environmentally concerned might welcome. The financial and banking crisis signals for many the tip of the iceberg of reality into which modern industrial economies must inevitably run. Growth of material and energy throughput is then doomed to sink. ... Societal, economic and environmental crises are unified as the result of an old but common deception that growth is good, more is better and there can be more for everyone. In the Green Economy the poor are promised environmental riches, recycled materials and renewable energy can be exploited without environmental impact, and technology always finds a substitute for what runs out. All things can be made compatible by ignoring the basic contradiction between ever-expanding human activity and a finite world.

Suggested Citation

  • Clive L. Spash, 2012. "Green Economy, Red Herring," Environmental Values, White Horse Press, vol. 21(2), pages 95-99, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:env:journl:ev21:editev212

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Benno Torgler & Maria A. Garcia-Valinas & Alison Macintyre, 2012. "Justifiability of Littering: An Empirical Investigation," Environmental Values, White Horse Press, vol. 21(2), pages 209-231, May.
    2. Clive L. Spash, 2011. "Terrible Economics, Ecosystems and Banking," Environmental Values, White Horse Press, vol. 20(2), pages 141-145, May.
    3. Rosemary Robins, 2012. "The Controversy over GM Canola in Australia as an Ontological Politics," Environmental Values, White Horse Press, vol. 21(2), pages 185-208, May.
    4. Kristof van Assche & Sandra Bell & Petruta Teampau, 2012. "Traumatic Natures of the Swamp: Concepts of Nature in the Romanian Danube Delta," Environmental Values, White Horse Press, vol. 21(2), pages 163-183, May.
    5. Clive L. Spash, 2010. "Censoring Science in Research Officially," Environmental Values, White Horse Press, vol. 19(2), pages 141-146, May.
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    Cited by:

    1. Clive L. Spash, 2013. "Changes Needed," Environmental Values, White Horse Press, vol. 22(1), pages 1-5, February.
    2. Spash, Clive L., 2013. "The shallow or the deep ecological economics movement?," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 93(C), pages 351-362.
    3. repec:eee:rensus:v:80:y:2017:i:c:p:481-494 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item


    Environmental crisis; Rio plus 20; Green Economy;

    JEL classification:

    • Q01 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - General - - - Sustainable Development
    • Q38 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Nonrenewable Resources and Conservation - - - Government Policy (includes OPEC Policy)
    • Q48 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Government Policy


    This item is featured on the following reading lists or Wikipedia pages:
    1. اقتصاد سبز in Wikipedia Persian ne '')
    2. Green economy in Wikipedia English ne '')


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