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The Permanent Effects of Recessions on Child Health: Evidence from Peru

Author

Listed:
  • Jorge M. Agüero

    (University of California, Riverside and SALDRU)

  • Martín Valdivia

    (Grupo de Análisis para el Desarrollo)

Abstract

We explore the permanent effects that recessions have on health-related outcomes of mothers and children in Peru. To account for possible self-selection in giving birth during recessions, we compare the infant mortality rates of siblings born in different phases of the economic cycle. A 1 percent decline in GDP per capita is associated with an increase in infant mortality rates between 0.30 and 0.39 percent. We find evidence that recessions also have a negative effect on long-term health measures for surviving children. The additional negative effect found on prenatal care suggests that the permanent effects start while children are in-utero.

Suggested Citation

  • Jorge M. Agüero & Martín Valdivia, 2010. "The Permanent Effects of Recessions on Child Health: Evidence from Peru," Estudios Económicos, El Colegio de México, Centro de Estudios Económicos, vol. 25(1), pages 247-274.
  • Handle: RePEc:emx:esteco:v:25:y:2010:i:1:p:247-274
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    Cited by:

    1. Verónica Frisancho Robles & R. Oropesa, 2011. "International Migration and the Education of Children: Evidence from Lima, Peru," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 30(4), pages 591-618, August.
    2. Joseph Cummins, 2013. "On the Use and Misuse of Child Height-for-Age Z-score in the Demographic and Health Surveys," Working Papers 201417, University of California at Riverside, Department of Economics.
    3. Ali, Amjad & Bibi, Chan, 2016. "Determinants of Social Progress and its Scenarios under the role of Macroeconomic Instability: Empirics from Pakistan," MPRA Paper 72920, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Pérez-Moreno, Salvador & Blanco-Arana, María C. & Bárcena-Martín, Elena, 2016. "Economic cycles and child mortality: A cross-national study of the least developed countries," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 22(C), pages 14-23.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    economic crises; early childhood development; health; Peru;

    JEL classification:

    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • J18 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Public Policy

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