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Country of birth, instrumental activities of daily living, self-rated health and mortality: a Swedish population-based survey of people aged 55-74

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  • Pudaric, Sonja
  • Sundquist, Jan
  • Johansson, Sven-Erik

Abstract

There is scant knowledge of the effects of country of birth on the health of individuals in the years prior to and after retirement. The aim of this study was to consider country of birth in relation to health status, instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) and all-cause mortality when adjusted for socioeconomic status (SES). Cross-sectional data were collected between 1986 and 1991 on 8959 individuals between the ages of 55 and 74. Self-reported data were analysed using a logistic regression model while the mortality data were analysed by means of a proportional hazard model. In the present study, immigrants from Southern Europe, Eastern Europe and Finland carried significantly increased risks of poor health even after adjustment for SES. Southern Europeans, refugees from Developing countries and Finns exhibited an increased risk of impaired IADL compared to Swedes, even after adjustment for SES. In conclusion, country of birth was associated with poor health status and impaired IADL. This association remained after adjustment for SES. In accordance with pre-study expectations, mortality was predicted by impaired IADL and male gender. Country of birth was not associated with all-cause mortality.

Suggested Citation

  • Pudaric, Sonja & Sundquist, Jan & Johansson, Sven-Erik, 2003. "Country of birth, instrumental activities of daily living, self-rated health and mortality: a Swedish population-based survey of people aged 55-74," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 56(12), pages 2493-2503, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:socmed:v:56:y:2003:i:12:p:2493-2503
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Signe Nielsen & Allan Krasnik, 2010. "Poorer self-perceived health among migrants and ethnic minorities versus the majority population in Europe: a systematic review," International Journal of Public Health, Springer;Swiss School of Public Health (SSPH+), vol. 55(5), pages 357-371, October.
    2. Malmusi, Davide & Borrell, Carme & Benach, Joan, 2010. "Migration-related health inequalities: Showing the complex interactions between gender, social class and place of origin," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 71(9), pages 1610-1619, November.
    3. D. Lanari & O. Bussini & L. Minelli, 2015. "Self-perceived health among Eastern European immigrants over 50 living in Western Europe," International Journal of Public Health, Springer;Swiss School of Public Health (SSPH+), vol. 60(1), pages 21-31, January.
    4. Österberg, Torun & Gustafsson, Björn, 2006. "Disability pension among immigrants in Sweden," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 63(3), pages 805-816, August.

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