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Economic role of solidarity and social capital in accessing modern health care services in the Ivory Coast

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  • Ayé, Marcellin
  • Champagne, François
  • Contandriopoulos, André-Pierre

Abstract

At the beginning of the 1990s, health service reforms were implemented in public health institutions in most African countries South of the Sahara. In the Ivory Coast, the imposition of user fees for public services was adopted in 1994. Such fees require each person to have adequate financial resources in order to access modern health care services. Many poor people--despite their poverty--are able to access modern health care services that have become quite expensive. The factor that allows this access lies within the solidarity of parents, friends or members of a social network. In Africa, illness is a social phenomenon and a state of illness is negative. The sick human being is one who cannot fully participate in community life. The treatment of a sick person is, then, an act, which is tied to the systems of life, which are produced and maintained collectively. Once the causes of illness are identified and consequences evaluated, it is the entire family or group that participates in the finances which bring about treatment. In this study, we show the role of social capital in the processes of financial solidarity for access to modern health care services that now require payment. Our investigation provides valuable insights on the role of social capital with respect to social strategies and community financing mechanisms for the acquisition of modern health care in Africa.

Suggested Citation

  • Ayé, Marcellin & Champagne, François & Contandriopoulos, André-Pierre, 2002. "Economic role of solidarity and social capital in accessing modern health care services in the Ivory Coast," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 55(11), pages 1929-1946, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:socmed:v:55:y:2002:i:11:p:1929-1946
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    Cited by:

    1. Riumallo-Herl, Carlos Javier & Kawachi, Ichiro & Avendano, Mauricio, 2014. "Social capital, mental health and biomarkers in Chile: Assessing the effects of social capital in a middle-income country," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 105(C), pages 47-58.
    2. Sheabo Dessalegn, S., 2017. "Social capital and maternal health care use in rural Ethiopia," Other publications TiSEM bb0ec225-4ec3-4028-90d6-1, Tilburg University, School of Economics and Management.
    3. Fiorillo, Damiano & Sabatini, Fabio, 2011. "Quality and quantity: The role of social interactions in self-reported individual health," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 73(11), pages 1644-1652.
    4. Thiede, Michael, 2005. "Information and access to health care: is there a role for trust?," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 61(7), pages 1452-1462, October.
    5. Martine Visser & Frikkie Booysen, 2004. "Determinants of the choice of health care facility utilised by individuals in HIV/AIDS-affected households in the Free State province of South Africa," SALDRU/CSSR Working Papers 087, Southern Africa Labour and Development Research Unit, University of Cape Town.
    6. Zhang, Licheng & Wang, Hong & Wang, Lushang & Hsiao, William, 2006. "Social capital and farmer's willingness-to-join a newly established community-based health insurance in rural China," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 76(2), pages 233-242, April.
    7. Musalia, John, 2016. "Social capital and health in Kenya: A multilevel analysis," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 167(C), pages 11-19.
    8. Khawaja, Marwan & Abdulrahim, Sawsan & Soweid, Rima A.Afifi. & Karam, Dima, 2006. "Distrust, social fragmentation and adolescents' health in the outer city: Beirut and beyond," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 63(5), pages 1304-1315, September.
    9. Chau-kiu Cheung, 2015. "Normative Influences on Civility in Hong Kong," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 120(1), pages 229-246, January.

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