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Representations And Influence Processes In Groups: Towards A Socio-Cognitive Perspective On Cognition In Organization




The cognitive approach to organizations assumes the existence of collective representations in organizations. This article critically examines this assumption and proposes the adoption of a socio-cognitive perspective on collective cognition in organizations. This theoretical current, which rejects the traditional individual/social dichotomy and relies on the concept of social representation, advocates the study of social cognition, which implies a change in the unit of analysis from the individual/social levels to interactions. A collective representation is viewed as being related to the socio-cognitive dynamics occurring between interacting group members. Communication and influence processes are thus critical to the construction of a collective representation. The socio-cognitive perspective, and the theory of social influence which it involves, can offer new and important insights on everyday thinking and behaving in organizations. However, this perspective calls for new methodological approaches to the study of organizational cognition.

Suggested Citation

  • Allard-Poesi, Florence, 1998. "Representations And Influence Processes In Groups: Towards A Socio-Cognitive Perspective On Cognition In Organization," Scandinavian Journal of Management, Elsevier, vol. 14(4), pages 395-420, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:scaman:v:14:y:1998:i:4:p:395-420

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    12. Grosse, Robert & Goldberg, Lawrence G., 1991. "Foreign bank activity in the United States: An analysis by country of origin," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 15(6), pages 1093-1112, December.
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:dau:papers:123456789/6461 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Kok, Robert A.W. & Hillebrand, Bas & Biemans, Wim G., 2002. "Market-oriented product development as an organizational learning capability: findings from two cases," Research Report 02B13, University of Groningen, Research Institute SOM (Systems, Organisations and Management).
    3. Yang, Kuo-Pin & Chou, Christine & Chiu, Yu-Jen, 2014. "How unlearning affects radical innovation: The dynamics of social capital and slack resources," Technological Forecasting and Social Change, Elsevier, vol. 87(C), pages 152-163.
    4. repec:dgr:rugsom:02b13 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Hale Dilek Suer & Florence Allard-Poesi, 2013. "How do judgments of justice form during periods of change: a sensemaking model," Post-Print hal-01123798, HAL.


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