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Social organization in the Minority Game model


  • Slanina, František


We study the role of imitation within the Minority Game model of market. The players can exchange information locally, which leads to formation of groups which act as if they were single players. Coherent spatial areas of rich and poor agents result. We found that the global effectivity is optimized at certain value of the imitation probability, which decreases with increasing memory length. The social tensions are suppressed for large imitation probability, but generally the requirements of high global effectivity and low social tensions are in conflict.

Suggested Citation

  • Slanina, František, 2000. "Social organization in the Minority Game model," Physica A: Statistical Mechanics and its Applications, Elsevier, vol. 286(1), pages 367-376.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:phsmap:v:286:y:2000:i:1:p:367-376 DOI: 10.1016/S0378-4371(00)00338-1

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Jean-Philippe Bouchaud & Didier Sornette & Marc Potters, 1997. "Option pricing in the presence of extreme fluctuations," Science & Finance (CFM) working paper archive 500038, Science & Finance, Capital Fund Management.
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    Cited by:

    1. Giorgio Fagiolo & Marco Valente, 2005. "Minority Games, Local Interactions, and Endogenous Networks," Computational Economics, Springer;Society for Computational Economics, vol. 25(1), pages 41-57, February.
    2. Shu-Heng Chen & Umberto Gostoli, 2017. "Coordination in the El Farol Bar problem: The role of social preferences and social networks," Journal of Economic Interaction and Coordination, Springer;Society for Economic Science with Heterogeneous Interacting Agents, vol. 12(1), pages 59-93, April.
    3. Shu-Heng Chen & Umberto Gostoli, 2011. "Agent-Based Modeling of the El Farol Bar Problem," ASSRU Discussion Papers 1120, ASSRU - Algorithmic Social Science Research Unit.
    4. Schweitzer, Frank & Zimmermann, Jörg & Mühlenbein, Heinz, 2002. "Coordination of decisions in a spatial agent model," Physica A: Statistical Mechanics and its Applications, Elsevier, vol. 303(1), pages 189-216.

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    Minority game; Self-organization; Economics;


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