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The Prerequisites for a Degrowth Paradigm Shift: Insights from Critical Political Economy

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  • Buch-Hansen, Hubert

Abstract

What would it take for a degrowth paradigm shift to take place? Drawing on contemporary critical political economy scholarship, this article identifies four prerequisites for socio-economic paradigm shifts: deep crisis, an alternative political project, a comprehensive coalition of social forces promoting the project in political struggles, and broad-based consent. It is argued that, on the one hand, there is much to suggest that current crises cannot be resolved under existing institutional frameworks and that degrowth is a political project that provides solutions to some of the key problems currently facing humanity. On the other hand, the prospects for a degrowth paradigm shift remain bleak: unlike political projects that became hegemonic in the past, degrowth has neither support from a comprehensive coalition of social forces nor any consent to its agenda among the broader population.

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  • Buch-Hansen, Hubert, 2018. "The Prerequisites for a Degrowth Paradigm Shift: Insights from Critical Political Economy," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 146(C), pages 157-163.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolec:v:146:y:2018:i:c:p:157-163
    DOI: 10.1016/j.ecolecon.2017.10.021
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    Cited by:

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    3. Clive L. Spash, 2019. "Making Pollution into a Market Failure Rather Than a Cost-Shifting Success: The Suppression of Revolutionary Change in Economics," SRE-Disc sre-disc-2019_06, Institute for Multilevel Governance and Development, Department of Socioeconomics, Vienna University of Economics and Business.
    4. Bosch, Stephan & Schmidt, Matthias, 2019. "Is the post-fossil era necessarily post-capitalistic? – The robustness and capabilities of green capitalism," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 161(C), pages 270-279.
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    6. Clive L. Spash, 2019. "Time for a Paradigm Shift: From Economic Growth and Price-Making Markets to Social Ecological Economics," SRE-Disc sre-disc-2019_07, Institute for Multilevel Governance and Development, Department of Socioeconomics, Vienna University of Economics and Business.
    7. Strunz, Sebastian & Schindler, Harry, 2018. "Identifying Barriers Toward a Post-growth Economy – A Political Economy View," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 153(C), pages 68-77.
    8. Drews, Stefan & Savin, Ivan & van den Bergh, Jeroen C.J.M., 2019. "Opinion Clusters in Academic and Public Debates on Growth-vs-Environment," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 157(C), pages 141-155.
    9. Angeliki Menegaki, 2018. "The Basic, the Solid, the Site-Specific and the Full or Total Index of Sustainable Economic Welfare (ISEW) for Turkey," Economies, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 6(2), pages 1-18, April.
    10. Åsa Nyblom & Karolina Isaksson & Mark Sanctuary & Aurore Fransolet & Peter Stigson, 2019. "Governance and Degrowth. Lessons from the 2008 Financial Crisis in Latvia and Iceland," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 11(6), pages 1-16, March.
    11. Spash, Clive L., 2020. "A tale of three paradigms: Realising the revolutionary potential of ecological economics," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 169(C).
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