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Used-Clothing Donations and Apparel Production in Africa

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  • Garth Frazer

Abstract

This article examines the importance of one possible explanation for the failure of African countries to step onto the bottom rung of the manufacturing sophistication ladder, that is to produce apparel. Used-clothing donations to thrift shops and other organisations in industrialised countries typically end up being sold to consumers in Africa. Since used clothing is initially provided as a donation, it shares characteristics with food aid, which always assists consumers, but at times harms African food producers. Used-clothing imports are found to have a negative impact on apparel production in Africa, explaining roughly 40% of the decline in production and 50% of the decline in employment over the period 1981-2000. Copyright © The Author(s). Journal compilation © Royal Economic Society 2008.

Suggested Citation

  • Garth Frazer, 2008. "Used-Clothing Donations and Apparel Production in Africa," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 118(532), pages 1764-1784, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:ecj:econjl:v:118:y:2008:i:532:p:1764-1784
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    Cited by:

    1. Sofronis Clerides & Costas Hadjiyiannis, 2004. "Trade-Inducing Quality Standards for Used Durables," University of Cyprus Working Papers in Economics 5-2004, University of Cyprus Department of Economics.
    2. Temple, Jonathan R.W., 2010. "Aid and Conditionality," Handbook of Development Economics, Elsevier.
    3. Calabrese, Linda & Balchin, Neil & Mendez-Parra, Maximiliano, 2017. "The phase-out of second-hand clothing imports: what impact for Tanzania?," MPRA Paper 82175, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Bernard, Sophie, 2015. "North–south trade in reusable goods: Green design meets illegal shipments of waste," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 69(C), pages 22-35.
    5. repec:fip:feddar:y:2012:p:2-17 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Andrew Brooks & David Simon, 2012. "Unravelling the Relationships between Used-Clothing Imports and the Decline of African Clothing Industries," Development and Change, International Institute of Social Studies, vol. 43(6), pages 1265-1290, November.
    7. Clerides, Sofronis, 2008. "Gains from trade in used goods: Evidence from automobiles," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 76(2), pages 322-336, December.
    8. Hanna Krings, 2015. "International Trade in Second-hand Electronic Goods and the Resulting Global Rebound Effect," MAGKS Papers on Economics 201538, Philipps-Universität Marburg, Faculty of Business Administration and Economics, Department of Economics (Volkswirtschaftliche Abteilung).

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