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Seasonality of Deaths in the U.S. by Age and Cause


  • Craig A. Feinstein

    (Social Security Administration)


In this paper, we analyze seasonality of deaths by age and cause in the U.S. using public use files for the years 1994 to 1998 by the methods of regression and a variation of Census Method II. We answer the following questions: For each age cohort, how much does each cause of death contribute to seasonality of deaths? What is the reason for the variation in seasonality of deaths with respect to age? We also analyze death records of Social Security Administration over a longer time period to examine how seasonality of deaths has changed since the mid-1970’s. We found that in general, the degree of seasonality in deaths has decreased over time for younger cohorts and has increased over time for older cohorts.

Suggested Citation

  • Craig A. Feinstein, 2002. "Seasonality of Deaths in the U.S. by Age and Cause," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 6(17), pages 471-488, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:dem:demres:v:6:y:2002:i:17

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    1. Heckman, James J & Hotz, V Joseph & Walker, James R, 1985. "New Evidence on the Timing and Spacing of Births," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 75(2), pages 179-184, May.
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    5. Young J. Kim & Robert Schoen, 2000. "On the Quantum and Tempo of Fertility: Limits to the Bongaarts-Feeney Adjustment," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 26(3), pages 554-559.
    6. Tomáš Sobotka, 2003. "Tempo-quantum and period-cohort interplay in fertility changes in Europe," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 8(6), pages 151-214, April.
    7. Hans-Peter Kohler & José Antonio Ortega, 2002. "Tempo-Adjusted Period Parity Progression Measures:," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 6(7), pages 145-190, March.
    8. Shelly Lundberg & Robert A. Pollak, 1996. "Bargaining and Distribution in Marriage," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 10(4), pages 139-158, Fall.
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    1. repec:dem:demres:v:37:y:2017:i:45 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item


    mortality; seasonality;

    JEL classification:

    • J1 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics
    • Z0 - Other Special Topics - - General


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