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Consumption-Driven Environmental Impact and Age Structure Change in OECD Countries

Author

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  • Brantley Liddle

    (Victoria University)

Abstract

This paper examines two environmental impacts for which population has a substantial demonstrated influence: transport carbon emissions and residential electricity consumption. It takes as its starting point the STIRPAT framework and disaggregates population into four key age groups: 20-34, 35-49, 50-69, and 70 and older. Population age structure’s influence was significant and varied across cohorts, and its profile was different for two dependent variables. For transport, young adults (20-34) were intensive, whereas the other cohorts had negative coefficients. For residential electricity consumption, age structure had a U-shaped impact: the youngest and oldest had positive coefficients, while the middle cohorts had negative coefficients.

Suggested Citation

  • Brantley Liddle, 2011. "Consumption-Driven Environmental Impact and Age Structure Change in OECD Countries," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 24(30), pages 749-770, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:dem:demres:v:24:y:2011:i:30
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. repec:gam:jsusta:v:10:y:2018:i:2:p:469-:d:131188 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Liddle, Brantley, 2013. "Urban Density and Climate Change: A STIRPAT Analysis using City-level Data," MPRA Paper 52089, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Underwood, Anthony & Zahran, Sammy, 2015. "The carbon implications of declining household scale economies," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 116(C), pages 182-190.
    4. repec:eee:enepol:v:115:y:2018:i:c:p:503-513 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Liddle, Brantley, 2013. "Population, Affluence, and Environmental Impact Across Development: Evidence from Panel Cointegration Modeling," MPRA Paper 52088, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Zhang, Chuanguo & Tan, Zheng, 2016. "The relationships between population factors and China's carbon emissions: Does population aging matter?," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 65(C), pages 1018-1025.
    7. Georgina Mace & Emma Terama & Tim Coulson, 2013. "Perspectives on International Trends and Dynamics in Population and Consumption," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 55(4), pages 555-568, August.
    8. Rentziou, Aikaterini & Gkritza, Konstantina & Souleyrette, Reginald R., 2012. "VMT, energy consumption, and GHG emissions forecasting for passenger transportation," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 46(3), pages 487-500.
    9. Sarah Harper, 2013. "Population–Environment Interactions: European Migration, Population Composition and Climate Change," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 55(4), pages 525-541, August.
    10. Fang, Wen Shwo & Miller, Stephen M. & Yeh, Chih-Chuan, 2012. "The effect of ESCOs on energy use," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 558-568.
    11. repec:khe:scajes:v:3:y:2017:i:2:p:60-67 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. Menz, Tobias & Welsch, Heinz, 2012. "Population aging and carbon emissions in OECD countries: Accounting for life-cycle and cohort effects," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(3), pages 842-849.
    13. Hasanov, Fakhri J. & Bulut, Cihan & Suleymanov, Elchin, 2016. "Do population age groups matter in the energy use of the oil-exporting countries?," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 54(C), pages 82-99.
    14. Okada, Akira, 2012. "Is an increased elderly population related to decreased CO2 emissions from road transportation?," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 286-292.
    15. repec:eee:enepol:v:117:y:2018:i:c:p:396-405 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    demography; environment; FMOLS panel cointegration; GHG emissions projections; IPAT; STIRPAT;

    JEL classification:

    • J1 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics
    • Z0 - Other Special Topics - - General

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