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Pre- and post-famine indices of Irish equity prices

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  • HICKSON, CHARLES R.
  • TURNER, JOHN D.

Abstract

The market for company stock in Ireland entered its formative period in the mid 1820s with the incorporation of banks and railways. Using data obtained from stockbroker lists, we estimate market capitalisation and construct weighted and unweighted monthly stock market indices for the period 1825–64. Our findings show that the market appears to have been relatively unaffected by the Famine. We suggest that an efficient-market explanation may better explain this finding than a dual-economy explanation. Our findings also show that the stock market increased significantly in value in the post-Famine period. This finding is consistent with an increase in demand for financial assets as well as the rapid commercialisation of the Irish economy.

Suggested Citation

  • Hickson, Charles R. & Turner, John D., 2008. "Pre- and post-famine indices of Irish equity prices," European Review of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 12(01), pages 3-38, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:cup:ereveh:v:12:y:2008:i:01:p:3-38_00
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    Cited by:

    1. Andersson, Fredrik N. G. & Lennard, Jason, 2016. "Irish GDP between the Famine and the First World War: Estimates Based on a Dynamic Factor Model," Working Papers 2016:13, Lund University, Department of Economics, revised 16 Jan 2018.
    2. McLaughlin, Eoin & Foley-Fisher, Nathan, 2013. "Irish Land Bonds: 1891-1938," SIRE Discussion Papers 2013-109, Scottish Institute for Research in Economics (SIRE).
    3. Foley-Fisher, Nathan & McLaughlin, Eoin, 2016. "Capitalising on the Irish land question: land reform and state banking in Ireland, 1891–1938," Financial History Review, Cambridge University Press, vol. 23(01), pages 71-109, April.

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