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Takings of Private Rights to Public Natural Resources: A Policy Analysis


  • Richard Schwindt
  • Steven Globerman


In Canada, the Crown has maintained ownership of important natural resources while allocating rights to exploit those resources to the private sector. Satisfying public demands for parks and wilderness areas, settling Aboriginal land claims and addressing resource depletion have led to the withdrawal of private rights. Knotty compensation issues have arisen. This paper sets out some basics for an efficient, equitable compensation policy. Examples of contemporary policy involving withdrawals of rights to hardrock minerals, timber, and Pacific salmon are reviewed. They reveal that the current policy is flawed, particularly regarding the basis for calculating compensation. Recommendations follow.

Suggested Citation

  • Richard Schwindt & Steven Globerman, 1996. "Takings of Private Rights to Public Natural Resources: A Policy Analysis," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 22(3), pages 205-224, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpp:issued:v:22:y:1996:i:3:p:205-224

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Sandmo, Agnar & Dreze, Jacques H, 1971. "Discount Rates for Public Investment in Closed and Open Economies," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 38(152), pages 395-412, November.
    2. Sjaastad, Larry A & Wisecarver, Daniel L, 1977. "The Social Cost of Public Finance," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 85(3), pages 513-547, June.
    3. Martin Feldstein & Lawrence Summers, 1983. "Inflation and the Taxation of Capital Income in the Corporate Sector," NBER Chapters,in: Inflation, Tax Rules, and Capital Formation, pages 116-152 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Dreze, Jacques H, 1974. "Discount Rates and Public Investment: A Post-Scriptum," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 41(161), pages 52-61, February.
    5. Arrow, Kenneth J & Lind, Robert C, 1970. "Uncertainty and the Evaluation of Public Investment Decisions," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 60(3), pages 364-378, June.
    6. M. T. Sumner, 1980. "Benefit-Cost Analysis in Canadian Practice," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 6(2), pages 389-393, Spring.
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    Cited by:

    1. Philippe Barla & Joseph A. Doucet & Jean-Daniel M. Saphores, 2000. "Protection des habitats d'espèces menacées en terres privée: analyse d'instruments et de la politique canadienne," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 26(1), pages 95-110, March.
    2. Niquidet, Kurt, 2008. "Revitalized? An event study of forest policy reform in British Columbia," Journal of Forest Economics, Elsevier, vol. 14(4), pages 227-241, November.

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