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Peer Effects on a Fertility Decision: an Application for Medellín, Colombia

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  • Leonardo Fabio Morales

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Abstract

This paper addresses the estimation of peer group effects on a fertility decision. The peer group is composed of neighbors with similar socio-demographic characteristics. In order to deal with the endogeneity problem associated to the estimation of neighborhood effects, an instrumental variables procedure is performed. To control for the reáection problem, usual in linear e§ects models, this paper uses an identification strategy that relies on the definition of peer groups at the individual level. This paper provides evidence that peer e§ects explain the age at which poor women in MedellÌn (Colombia) decide to have their firstborn. These social forces are hazardous factors that may increase the incidence of adolescent pregnancy.

Suggested Citation

  • Leonardo Fabio Morales, 2015. "Peer Effects on a Fertility Decision: an Application for Medellín, Colombia," Economía Journal, The Latin American and Caribbean Economic Association - LACEA, vol. 0(Spring 20), pages 119-159, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:col:000425:012573
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    1. Gary S. Becker, 1981. "A Treatise on the Family," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number beck81-1, March.
    2. Alejandro Gaviria & Carlos Medina & Leonardo Morales & Jairo Núñez, 2010. "The Cost of Avoiding Crime: The Case of Bogotá," NBER Chapters, in: The Economics of Crime: Lessons for and from Latin America, pages 101-132, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Leonardo Morales & Carlos Medina, 2007. "Stratification and Public Utility Services in Colombia: Subsidies to Households or Distortion of Housing Prices?," Economía Journal, The Latin American and Caribbean Economic Association - LACEA, vol. 0(Spring 20), pages 41-99, January.
    4. Iyer, S. & Weeks, M., 2009. "Social Interactions, Ethnicity and Fertility in Kenya," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 0903, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
    5. Soto, Victoria Eugenia & Flórez Nieto, Carmen Elisa, 2007. "Fecundidad adolescente y desigualdad en Colombia," Notas de Población, Naciones Unidas Comisión Económica para América Latina y el Caribe (CEPAL).
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    8. Giacomo De Giorgi & Michele Pellizzari & Silvia Redaelli, 2010. "Identification of Social Interactions through Partially Overlapping Peer Groups," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 2(2), pages 241-275, April.
    9. Marcela Meléndez Arjona & Camila Casas & Pablo Medina, 2004. "Subsidios al consumo de los servicios públicos en Colombia ¿hacia donde movernos?," Informes de Investigación 003529, Fedesarrollo.
    10. Hans-Peter Kohler & Jere Behrman & Susan Watkins, 2001. "The density of social networks and fertility decisions: evidence from south nyanza district, kenya," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 38(1), pages 43-58, February.
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    Cited by:

    1. Leonardo Fabio Morales & Carlos Medina, 2017. "Assessing the Effect of Payroll Taxes on Formal Employment: The Case of the 2012 Tax Reform in Colombia," Economía Journal, The Latin American and Caribbean Economic Association - LACEA, vol. 0(Fall 2017), pages 75-124, November.
    2. Carlos Medina & Christian Posso & Jorge Andrés Tamayo, 2011. "Costos de la violencia urbana y políticas públicas: algunas lecciones de Medellín," BORRADORES DE ECONOMIA 009076, BANCO DE LA REPÚBLICA.
    3. Leonardo Fabio Morales & Lina Cardona-Sosa, 2015. "Calidad de los vecindarios y oferta laboral femenina en un contexto urbano: un caso aplicado a la ciudad de Medellín," BORRADORES DE ECONOMIA 012588, BANCO DE LA REPÚBLICA.
    4. Leonardo Fabio Morales & Lina Cardona-Sosa, 2014. "The Influence of Neighborhood Characteristics on Wages and Labor Supply in an Urban Context: The Case of a Latin-American City," Borradores de Economia 844, Banco de la Republica de Colombia.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Fertility; endogeneity; peer effects; pregnancy;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • C31 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Cross-Sectional Models; Spatial Models; Treatment Effect Models; Quantile Regressions; Social Interaction Models

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