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Productive Public Expenditure in a New Economic Geography Model

Author

Listed:
  • Pasquale Commendatore
  • Ingrid Kubin
  • Carmelo Petraglia

Abstract

This paper elaborates on Baldwin’s (1999) New Economic Geography model allowing for capital accumulation and capital mobility between a “rich” and a “poor” region. A central government decides upon the level and the regional and sectoral allocation of productivity enhancing public investments. We derive results on how such policies affect the overall private capital stock and its regional allocation under alternative financing schemes. We show that the regional and sectoral distribution of public capital matters in determining the final impact of an increase in public capital on the level of private capital. Furthermore, we find that increasing public capital in the “poor” region does not always increase the share of manufacturing in that region as the final result depends on the relative strength of two effects which have been studied separately in the literature so far: the “productivity” and the “demand” effects. Finally, we show that in order to be effective regional policy must not confine itself to the expenditure side but has to take into account the financing side at the same time.

Suggested Citation

  • Pasquale Commendatore & Ingrid Kubin & Carmelo Petraglia, 2008. "Productive Public Expenditure in a New Economic Geography Model," Economie Internationale, CEPII research center, issue 114, pages 133-160.
  • Handle: RePEc:cii:cepiei:2008-2te
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    File URL: http://www.cepii.fr/IE/rev114/ei114e.htm
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Borck, Rainald & Pfluger, Michael, 2006. "Agglomeration and tax competition," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 50(3), pages 647-668, April.
    2. Pasquale Commendatore & Martin Currie & Ingrid Kubin, 2008. "Footloose Entrepreneurs, Taxes and Subsidies," Spatial Economic Analysis, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 3(1), pages 115-141.
    3. Rikard Forslid & Gianmarco I.P. Ottaviano, 2003. "An analytically solvable core-periphery model," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 3(3), pages 229-240, July.
    4. Martin, Philippe & Ottaviano, Gianmarco I P, 2001. "Growth and Agglomeration," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 42(4), pages 947-968, November.
    5. Krugman, Paul, 1991. "Increasing Returns and Economic Geography," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 99(3), pages 483-499, June.
    6. Martin, Philippe & I.P. Ottaviano, Gianmarco, 1999. "Growing locations: Industry location in a model of endogenous growth," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 43(2), pages 281-302, February.
    7. Commendatore, P. & Kubin, I., 2006. "Taxation on Agglomeration," CeNDEF Working Papers 06-08, Universiteit van Amsterdam, Center for Nonlinear Dynamics in Economics and Finance.
    8. Baldwin, Richard E. & Krugman, Paul, 2004. "Agglomeration, integration and tax harmonisation," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 48(1), pages 1-23, February.
    9. Vincent Dupont & Philippe Martin, 2006. "Subsidies to poor regions and inequalities: some unpleasant arithmetic," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 6(2), pages 223-240, April.
    10. Martin, Philippe, 1999. "Public policies, regional inequalities and growth," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 73(1), pages 85-105, July.
    11. Martin, Philippe & Rogers, Carol Ann, 1995. "Industrial location and public infrastructure," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, pages 335-351.
    12. Brulhart, Marius & Trionfetti, Federico, 2004. "Public expenditure, international specialisation and agglomeration," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 48(4), pages 851-881, August.
    13. Forslid, Rikard, 1999. "Agglomeration with Human and Physical Capital: an Analytically Solvable Case," CEPR Discussion Papers 2102, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
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    Cited by:

    1. Rhydian James & Peter Midmore & Dennis Thomas, 2012. "Public Sector Size and Peripherality," Spatial Economic Analysis, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 7(4), pages 447-460, December.
    2. Gerritse, Michiel, 2014. "Competing for firms under agglomeration: Policy timing and welfare," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 48-57.
    3. Stefan Wrzaczek, 2014. "Social optimality in the constructed-capital model," Central European Journal of Operations Research, Springer;Slovak Society for Operations Research;Hungarian Operational Research Society;Czech Society for Operations Research;Österr. Gesellschaft für Operations Research (ÖGOR);Slovenian Society Informatika - Section for Operational Research;Croatian Operational Research Society, vol. 22(1), pages 211-232, March.
    4. Pasquale Commendatore & Ingrid Kubin & Carmelo Petraglia, 2009. "Footloose Capital and Productive Public Services," Chapters,in: Geography, Structural Change and Economic Development, chapter 1 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    5. Michiel Gerritse, 2010. "Policy competition and agglomeration: a local government view," Working Papers 2010/31, Institut d'Economia de Barcelona (IEB).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    New economic geography; public expenditure; footloose capital;

    JEL classification:

    • F20 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - General
    • H5 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies
    • R12 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Size and Spatial Distributions of Regional Economic Activity; Interregional Trade (economic geography)

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