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Regulatory Impressionism: What Regulators Can and Cannot Do

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  • Gifford Raymond L.

    () (The Progress and Freedom Foundation)

Abstract

The decision-making process in state utility commissions is best described as "regulatory impressionism." Working in concert with longstanding notions of judicial deference, the existence of regulatory impressionism has far-reaching implications for the move towards a competitive marketplace in the digital age. This article explores how state commissions should operate given a plethora of constraints from both internal and external sources, concluding that the most effective reforms must come from within.

Suggested Citation

  • Gifford Raymond L., 2003. "Regulatory Impressionism: What Regulators Can and Cannot Do," Review of Network Economics, De Gruyter, vol. 2(4), pages 1-14, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:bpj:rneart:v:2:y:2003:i:4:n:10
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    Cited by:

    1. Gregory L. Rosston & Scott J. Savage & Bradley S. Wimmer, 2008. "The Effect of Private Interests on Regulated Retail and Wholesale Prices," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 51(3), pages 479-501, August.
    2. Carlos Perez Montes, 2012. "Regulatory bias in the price structure of local telephone services," Working Papers 1201, Banco de España;Working Papers Homepage.
    3. Gregory L. Rosston & Scott J. Savage & Bradley S. Wimmer, 2006. "The Impact of "Deregulation" on Regulator Behavior: An Empirical Analysis of the Telecommunications Act of 1996," Discussion Papers 05-006, Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research.
    4. David Sappington & Dennis Weisman, 2012. "Regulating regulators in transitionally competitive markets," Journal of Regulatory Economics, Springer, vol. 41(1), pages 19-40, February.
    5. Pérez Montes, Carlos, 2013. "Regulatory bias in the price structure of local telephone service," International Journal of Industrial Organization, Elsevier, vol. 31(5), pages 462-476.

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