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Who Lives on the Wrong Side of the Environmental Tracks? Evidence from the EPA's Risk-Screening Environmental Indicators Model


  • Michael Ash
  • T. Robert Fetter


We analyze the social and economic correlates of air pollution exposure in U.S. cities. Copyright (c) 2004 by the Southwestern Social Science Association.

Suggested Citation

  • Michael Ash & T. Robert Fetter, 2004. "Who Lives on the Wrong Side of the Environmental Tracks? Evidence from the EPA's Risk-Screening Environmental Indicators Model," Social Science Quarterly, Southwestern Social Science Association, vol. 85(2), pages 441-462.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:socsci:v:85:y:2004:i:2:p:441-462

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Mark D. Shapiro & Steven M. Hassur & Nicholaas W. Bouwes, 2001. "Empowerment Through Risk-Related Information: EPA's Risk Screening Environmental Indicators Project," Working Papers wp18, Political Economy Research Institute, University of Massachusetts at Amherst.
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    Cited by:

    1. Hackbarth, Andrew D. & Romley, John A. & Goldman, Dana P., 2011. "Racial and ethnic disparities in hospital care resulting from air pollution in excess of federal standards," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 73(8), pages 1163-1168.
    2. Miller, Douglas L. & Paxson, Christina, 2006. "Relative income, race, and mortality," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 25(5), pages 979-1003, September.
    3. Ian Parry & Hilary Sigman & Margaret Walls & Roberton Williams, 2005. "The Incidence of Pollution Control Policies," Departmental Working Papers 200504, Rutgers University, Department of Economics.
    4. Ash, Michael & Boyce, James K., 2016. "Assessing the jobs-environment relationship with matched data from US EEOC and US EPA," UMASS Amherst Economics Working Papers 2016-03, University of Massachusetts Amherst, Department of Economics.
    5. Bouvier, Rachel, 2014. "Distribution of income and toxic emissions in Maine, United States: Inequality in two dimensions," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 102(C), pages 39-47.
    6. Cristina Legot & Bruce London & John Shandra & Anna Rosofsky, 2011. "Proximity to Industrial Releases of Toxins and Childhood Respiratory, Developmental, and Neurological Diseases: Environmental Ascription in East Baton Rouge Parish: Revised," Working Papers wp236_revised, Political Economy Research Institute, University of Massachusetts at Amherst.
    7. Bernard, Sophie & Hotte, Louis & Winer, Stanley L., 2014. "Democracy, inequality and the environment when citizens can mitigate health consequences of pollution privately or act collectively," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 34(C), pages 142-156.
    8. repec:gam:jsusta:v:9:y:2017:i:10:p:1871-:d:115479 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. repec:gam:jsusta:v:9:y:2017:i:10:p:1886-:d:115864 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Germani, Anna Rita & Morone, Piergiuseppe & Testa, Giuseppina, 2014. "Environmental justice and air pollution: A case study on Italian provinces," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 106(C), pages 69-82.
    11. James Boyce, 2007. "Is Inequality Bad for the Environment?," Working Papers wp135, Political Economy Research Institute, University of Massachusetts at Amherst.
    12. Verchere, Alban, 2017. "The Middle-class Collapse and the Environment," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 131(C), pages 510-523.
    13. Zwickl, Klara & Ash, Michael & Boyce, James K., 2014. "Regional variation in environmental inequality: Industrial air toxics exposure in U.S. cities," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 107(C), pages 494-509.

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