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Catholic-Protestant Income Differences in Northern Ireland


  • Borooah, Vani K, et al


The purpose of this paper is to analyze income differences between Catholic and Protestant families in Northern Ireland using Family Expenditure Survey micro-data. The paper's first conclusion is that there is much greater inequality within the Catholic and Protestant communities than there is between them. It's second conclusion, based upon econometric analysis of data for full-time employees, is that the lower mean income of Catholics, relative to Protestants, could be entirely explained in terms of different rates of reward attached to a given set of labor market characteristics. Coauthors are Patricia M. McKee, Norma Heaton, and Grainne Collins. Copyright 1995 by The International Association for Research in Income and Wealth.

Suggested Citation

  • Borooah, Vani K, et al, 1995. "Catholic-Protestant Income Differences in Northern Ireland," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 41(1), pages 41-56, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:revinw:v:41:y:1995:i:1:p:41-56

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Borooah, Vani, 2001. "The Measurement of Employment Inequality Between Population Subgroups: Theory and Application," MPRA Paper 19417, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Borooah, Vani K., 1999. "Is there a penalty to being a Catholic in Northern Ireland: an econometric analysis of the relationship between religious belief and occupational success1," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 15(2), pages 163-192, June.

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