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International Environmental Permit Trade and Debt: The Consequences of Country Sovereignty and Cross-Default Policies


  • Mohr, Ernst


We investigate the joint occurrence of international intertemporal trade and international environmental-permit trade, both of which are subject to country sovereignty. Assuming that side payments cannot be made to keep a debtor country from terminating international environmental cooperation, we analyze the impact of these two trade opportunties on a debtor country's incentive to continue environmental cooperation. We also show how, by way of a suitable strategic linkage between debt and permit trade, the public good of ensuring continued environmental cooperation can be provided by the supply side of private international loans. Copyright 1995 by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

Suggested Citation

  • Mohr, Ernst, 1995. "International Environmental Permit Trade and Debt: The Consequences of Country Sovereignty and Cross-Default Policies," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 3(1), pages 1-19, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:reviec:v:3:y:1995:i:1:p:1-19

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. James E. Anderson & J. Peter Neary, 1996. "A New Approach to Evaluating Trade Policy," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 63(1), pages 107-125.
    2. Hatta, Tatsuo, 1977. "A Recommendation for a Better Tariff Structure," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 45(8), pages 1859-1869, November.
    3. Anderson, James E & Neary, J Peter, 1992. "Trade Reform with Quotas, Partial Rent Retention, and Tariffs," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 60(1), pages 57-76, January.
    4. Anderson, James E. & Bannister, Geoffrey, 1992. "The trade restrictiveness index : an application to Mexican agriculture," Policy Research Working Paper Series 874, The World Bank.
    5. Bertrand, Trent J & Vanek, Jaroslav, 1971. "The Theory of Tariffs, Taxes, and Subsidies: Some Aspects of the Second Best," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 61(5), pages 925-931, December.
    6. Tatsuo Hatta, 1977. "A Theory of Piecemeal Policy Recommendations," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 44(1), pages 1-21.
    7. Lopez, Ramon & Panagariya, Arvind, 1992. "On the Theory of Piecemeal Tariff Reform: The Case of Pure Imported Intermediate Inputs," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 82(3), pages 615-625, June.
    8. Fukushima, Takashi, 1979. "Tariff Structure, Nontraded Goods and Theory of Piecemeal Policy Recommendations," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 20(2), pages 427-435, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Barbara Buchner & Carlo Carraro & Igor Cersosimo & Carmen Marchiori, 2002. "Back to Kyoto? US Participation and the Linkage between R&D and Climate Cooperation," CESifo Working Paper Series 688, CESifo Group Munich.
    2. Mohr, Ernst & Thomas, Jonathan P., 1998. "Pooling sovereign risks: The case of environmental treaties and international debt," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 55(1), pages 173-190, February.
    3. Josef Janssen, 1999. "(Self-) Enforcement of Joint Implementation and Clean Development Mechanism Contracts," Working Papers 1999.14, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei.
    4. Kemfert, Claudia & Zhang, ZhongXiang, 2003. "Linking developing country's cooperation on climate control with industrialized country's R&D and technology transfer," MPRA Paper 41473, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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