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Residential Immobility of the Elderly: An Empirical Investigation

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  • James D. Reschovsky

Abstract

This paper investigates the reasons for the substantially lower residential mobility rates among the elderly than the non-elderly. Households with low propensities to move are posited to be those that face few benefits from moving-that is, they are near equilibrium with respect to their housing consumption and tenure choice-or those that face large costs to moving. Using household data from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics, measures of housing disequilibrium and tenure disequilibrium were constructed. Elderly renters were found to be largely in equilibrium and would benefit little from moving. In contrast, elderly homeowners are more likely to be in substantial disequilibrium than their younger counterparts. Conclusions as to which costs to moving are most salient could not be made. Copyright American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association.

Suggested Citation

  • James D. Reschovsky, 1990. "Residential Immobility of the Elderly: An Empirical Investigation," Real Estate Economics, American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association, vol. 18(2), pages 160-183.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:reesec:v:18:y:1990:i:2:p:160-183
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    Cited by:

    1. VanderHart, Peter G., 1998. "The Housing Decisions of Older Households: A Dynamic Analysis," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 7(1), pages 21-48, March.
    2. Megbolugbe, Isaac & Sa-Aadu, J. & Shilling, James D., 1999. "Elderly Female-Headed Households and the Decision to Trade Down," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 8(4), pages 285-300, December.
    3. Kwan Ok Lee & Gary Painter, 2014. "Housing Tenure Transitions of Older Households: What is the Role of Child Proximity?," Real Estate Economics, American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association, vol. 42(1), pages 109-152, March.
    4. Shu-Mei Chen & I-Chuan Yang, 2013. "Mobility, Housing Decisions and Economic Status of the Elderly in Taiwan," ERES eres2013_288, European Real Estate Society (ERES).
    5. Forgionne, G. A., 1996. "Forecasting army housing supply with a DSS-delivered econometric model," Omega, Elsevier, vol. 24(5), pages 561-576, October.
    6. Russell James, 2008. "Residential Satisfaction of Elderly Tenants in Apartment Housing," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 89(3), pages 421-437, December.

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