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First Impressions from the 2000 Census of China

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  • William Lavely

Abstract

The 2000 census of China has several notable innovations, including a sample long form containing detailed items on migration, housing, and employment. Preliminary data indicate rapid urbanization and continued rapid social change in the 1990s, and apparent success in the government's drive to curtail population growth. Although a post‐enumeration survey indicates that overall data quality is good, the rise of a mobile “floating population” and pressures of the birth planning program caused problems for the enumeration of migrants and infants. Data released to date have been silent on two important issues, fertility and rising sex ratios.

Suggested Citation

  • William Lavely, 2001. "First Impressions from the 2000 Census of China," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 27(4), pages 755-769, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:popdev:v:27:y:2001:i:4:p:755-769
    DOI: 10.1111/j.1728-4457.2001.00755.x
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    File URL: https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1728-4457.2001.00755.x
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    Cited by:

    1. Yong Cai, 2013. "China's New Demographic Reality: Learning from the 2010 Census," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 39(3), pages 371-396, September.
    2. Christopher Candelaria & Mary Daly & Galina Hale, 2015. "Persistence of Regional Wage Differences in China," Pacific Economic Review, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 20(3), pages 365-387, August.
    3. Avraham Ebenstein & Yaohui Zhao, 2015. "Tracking rural-to-urban migration in China: Lessons from the 2005 inter-census population survey," Population Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 69(3), pages 337-353, November.
    4. Zheng Song & Kjetil Storesletten & Yikai Wang & Fabrizio Zilibotti, 2015. "Sharing High Growth across Generations: Pensions and Demographic Transition in China," American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 7(2), pages 1-39, April.
    5. Quanbao Jiang & Shuzhuo Li & Marcus Feldman, 2011. "Demographic Consequences of Gender Discrimination in China: Simulation Analysis of Policy Options," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 30(4), pages 619-638, August.
    6. Zhang, Yi & Matz, Julia Anna, 2017. "On the train to brain gain in rural China," Discussion Papers 252443, University of Bonn, Center for Development Research (ZEF).
    7. Mary C. Daly & Christopher Candelaria & Galina Hale, 2009. "Beyond Kuznets: persistent regional inequality in China," Working Paper Series 2009-07, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, revised 2009.
    8. Johnson, D. Gale, 2003. "Provincial migration in China in the 1990s," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 14(1), pages 22-31.
    9. Daniel Goodkind, 2011. "Child Underreporting, Fertility, and Sex Ratio Imbalance in China," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 48(1), pages 291-316, February.

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