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Linking, de-linking and re-linking: Southeast Asia in the global economy in the twentieth century

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  • Anne Booth

Abstract

This paper examines how links between the economies of Southeast Asia and the world economy have changed over the twentieth century, paying particular attention to growth in commodity exports, investment flows and international migration. Most parts of Southeast Asia expanded their links with the global economy in the latter part of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, but the years from 1940 to 1965 saw a decline in Southeast Asia's share of tropical exports, and of direct foreign investment. Migration flows also slowed. Over the last four decades of the twentieth century, international links expanded again, but there have been marked variations between countries. Copyright Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd and the Economic History Society of Australia and New Zealand 2004.

Suggested Citation

  • Anne Booth, 2004. "Linking, de-linking and re-linking: Southeast Asia in the global economy in the twentieth century," Australian Economic History Review, Economic History Society of Australia and New Zealand, vol. 44(1), pages 35-51, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:ozechr:v:44:y:2004:i:1:p:35-51
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    Cited by:

    1. Wolcott, Susan, 2010. "Explorations' contribution to the 'Asian Century'," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 47(3), pages 360-367, July.

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