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Operational Improvement: The Key to Value Creation in Private Equity


  • Gary Matthews
  • Mark Bye
  • James Howland


With credit tightening having reduced the availability of leverage and intensified the competition for new deals, the economic recession has caused many companies in private equity firm portfolios to under-perform. These changes are forcing the private equity firms to depend even more on their ability to improve operating performance to achieve their investment goals and generate attractive returns. But few PE firms have proved capable of achieving such improvements in portfolio companies consistently over time. Copyright Copyright (c) 2009 Morgan Stanley.

Suggested Citation

  • Gary Matthews & Mark Bye & James Howland, 2009. "Operational Improvement: The Key to Value Creation in Private Equity," Journal of Applied Corporate Finance, Morgan Stanley, vol. 21(3), pages 21-27.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:jacrfn:v:21:y:2009:i:3:p:21-27

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Michael C. Jensen, 2010. "Value Maximization, Stakeholder Theory, and the Corporate Objective Function," Journal of Applied Corporate Finance, Morgan Stanley, vol. 22(1), pages 32-42.
    2. Jensen, Michael C. & Meckling, William H., 1976. "Theory of the firm: Managerial behavior, agency costs and ownership structure," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 3(4), pages 305-360, October.
    3. Rose, Caspar & Thomsen, Steen, 2004. "The Impact of Corporate Reputation on Performance:: Some Danish Evidence," European Management Journal, Elsevier, vol. 22(2), pages 201-210, April.
    4. Paul Milgrom & John Roberts, 1986. "Relying on the Information of Interested Parties," RAND Journal of Economics, The RAND Corporation, vol. 17(1), pages 18-32, Spring.
    5. Burton G. Malkiel, 2003. "The Efficient Market Hypothesis and Its Critics," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 17(1), pages 59-82, Winter.
    6. Klein, Benjamin & Leffler, Keith B, 1981. "The Role of Market Forces in Assuring Contractual Performance," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 89(4), pages 615-641, August.
    7. Borenstein, Severin & Zimmerman, Martin B, 1988. "Market Incentives for Safe Commercial Airline Operation," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 78(5), pages 913-935, December.
    8. Beatty, Randolph P. & Ritter, Jay R., 1986. "Investment banking, reputation, and the underpricing of initial public offerings," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 15(1-2), pages 213-232.
    9. Burton G. Malkiel, 2003. "The Efficient Market Hypothesis and Its Critics," Working Papers 111, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Center for Economic Policy Studies..
    10. Barbara Lougee & James Wallace, 2008. "The Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) Trend," Journal of Applied Corporate Finance, Morgan Stanley, vol. 20(1), pages 96-108.
    11. repec:pri:cepsud:91malkiel is not listed on IDEAS
    12. Karpoff, Jonathan M & Lott, John R, Jr, 1993. "The Reputational Penalty Firms Bear from Committing Criminal Fraud," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 36(2), pages 757-802, October.
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    Cited by:

    1. David H. Downs & Steffen Sebastian & René-Ojas Woltering, 2017. "Public vs. Private Market Arbitrage – Can Growth REITs Benefit from their High Valuation?," ERES eres2017_329, European Real Estate Society (ERES).

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