IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/bla/growch/v36y2005i4p565-576.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

A Note on Localization and Specialization

Author

Listed:
  • GORDON F. MULLIGAN
  • CHARLES SCHMIDT

Abstract

ABSTRACT Analysts and policy makers frequently measure industrial localization and regional specialization. However, they rarely examine the nation's full array of industries or regions. So local indices, appropriate for specific industries or selected regions, are typically estimated. But in some instances global indices would be preferable in order to assess the wider features of the entire space‐economy. This article constructs global indices from the local indices already used in assessing localization and specialization. Global localization and global specialization are shown to be identical when all local indices use the dissimilarity logic. Two‐digit standard industry codes manufacturing data, taken from the U.S. during 1958–1995, are used to illustrate the results. The values of these global coefficients, like their local constituents, are shown to vary with geographic scale. The discussion addresses spatial distributions (evenness) but not geographic arrangements (clustering).

Suggested Citation

  • Gordon F. Mulligan & Charles Schmidt, 2005. "A Note on Localization and Specialization," Growth and Change, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 36(4), pages 565-576, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:growch:v:36:y:2005:i:4:p:565-576
    DOI: 10.1111/j.1468-2257.2005.00295.x
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-2257.2005.00295.x
    Download Restriction: no
    ---><---

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Run Yu & Junning Cai & PingSun Leung, 2009. "The normalized revealed comparative advantage index," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 43(1), pages 267-282, March.
    2. Michael Carroll & Neil Reid & Bruce Smith, 2008. "Location quotients versus spatial autocorrelation in identifying potential cluster regions," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 42(2), pages 449-463, June.
    3. Valerien O. Pede & Raymond J. G. M. Florax & Henri L. F. de Groot & Gustavo Barboza, 2021. "Technological leadership and sectorial employment growth: A spatial econometric analysis for U.S. counties," Economic Notes, Banca Monte dei Paschi di Siena SpA, vol. 50(1), February.
    4. Eleonora CUTRINI, 2006. "The Balassa Index Meets the Dissimilarity Theil Index: a Decomposition Methodology for Location Studies," Working Papers 274, Universita' Politecnica delle Marche (I), Dipartimento di Scienze Economiche e Sociali.
    5. Cutrini, Eleonora, 2009. "Using entropy measures to disentangle regional from national localization patterns," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 39(2), pages 243-250, March.
    6. Charis Vlados & Dimos Chatzinikolaou & Fotios Katimertzopoulos & Theodore Koutroukis, 2019. "Regional underdevelopment and less developed business ecosystems: The case of Eastern Macedonia and Thrace," Bulletin of Applied Economics, Risk Market Journals, vol. 6(2), pages 31-44.
    7. Federico Pablo-Martí & Josep-Maria Arauzo-Carod, 2020. "Spatial distribution of economic activities: a network approach," Journal of Economic Interaction and Coordination, Springer;Society for Economic Science with Heterogeneous Interacting Agents, vol. 15(2), pages 441-470, April.
    8. HAEDO, Christian & MOUCHART, Michel, 2012. "A stochastic independence approach for different measures of concentration and specialization," LIDAM Discussion Papers CORE 2012025, Université catholique de Louvain, Center for Operations Research and Econometrics (CORE).
    9. Gómez-Zaldívar, Manuel & Mosqueda, Marco T. & Duran, Jazmin A., 2017. "Localization of manufacturing industries and specialization in Mexican states: 1993–2013," MPRA Paper 76510, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bla:growch:v:36:y:2005:i:4:p:565-576. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Wiley Content Delivery). General contact details of provider: http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journal.asp?ref=0017-4815 .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.