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What room for accident in history?: explaining big changes by small events

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  • DAVID S. LANDES

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  • David S. Landes, 1994. "What room for accident in history?: explaining big changes by small events," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 47(4), pages 637-656, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:ehsrev:v:47:y:1994:i:4:p:637-656
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/j.1468-0289.1994.tb01395.x
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    Cited by:

    1. Lopez-Claros, Augusto & Perotti, Valeria, 2014. "Does culture matter for development ?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7092, The World Bank.
    2. Giovanni Dosi & Maria Enrica Virgillito, 2016. "In order to stand up you must keep cycling: change and coordination in complex evolving economies," LEM Papers Series 2016/39, Laboratory of Economics and Management (LEM), Sant'Anna School of Advanced Studies, Pisa, Italy.
    3. Nico Voigtländer & Hans-Joachim Voth, 2005. "Why England? Demand, Growth and Inequality During the Industrial Revolution," Working Papers 208, Barcelona Graduate School of Economics.
    4. Kemp, R. & van den Bergh, J., 2006. "Economics and Transitions: Lessons from Economic Sub-disciplines," MERIT Working Papers 038, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
    5. Nico Voigtländer & Hans-Joachim Voth, 2006. "Why England? Demographic factors, structural change and physical capital accumulation during the Industrial Revolution," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 11(4), pages 319-361, December.
    6. Robert W. Fogel, 2008. "The Impact of the Asian Miracle on the Theory of Economic Growth," NBER Chapters,in: Understanding Long-Run Economic Growth: Geography, Institutions, and the Knowledge Economy, pages 311-354 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Werner Hölzl & Andreas Reinstaller, 2000. "The Adoption and Enforcement of a Technological Regime: The Case of the first IT Regime," Working Papers geewp12, Vienna University of Economics and Business Research Group: Growth and Employment in Europe: Sustainability and Competitiveness.

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