IDEAS home Printed from
   My bibliography  Save this article

Total Factor Productivity and Economic Growth--Issues for Asia


  • Dowling, Malcolm
  • Summers, Peter M


Despite these disagreements about the nature of the role of government, particularly in Taiwan and Korea, the pattern of economic growth and structural change observed in developing Asia has been broadly consistent with classical and neoclassical models of economic growth and development which stress, respectively, specialisation in line with comparative advantage and the importance of capital accumulation.
(This abstract was borrowed from another version of this item.)

Suggested Citation

  • Dowling, Malcolm & Summers, Peter M, 1998. "Total Factor Productivity and Economic Growth--Issues for Asia," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 74(225), pages 170-185, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:ecorec:v:74:y:1998:i:225:p:170-85

    Download full text from publisher

    To our knowledge, this item is not available for download. To find whether it is available, there are three options:
    1. Check below whether another version of this item is available online.
    2. Check on the provider's web page whether it is in fact available.
    3. Perform a search for a similarly titled item that would be available.

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Ian R. Harper, 1997. "The Wallis Report: An Overview," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 30(3), pages 288-300.
    2. Tom Valentine, 1992. "Lessons From Australia's Lending Experience in the Eighties," Working Paper Series 21, Finance Discipline Group, UTS Business School, University of Technology, Sydney.
    3. Penny Neal, 1997. "The Wallis Inquiry: Financial Regulation And Systemic Instability," Economic Papers, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 16(2), pages 19-27, June.
    4. Brooks, Robert D & Faff, Robert W, 1995. "Financial Market Deregulation and Bank Risk: Testing for Beta Instability," Australian Economic Papers, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 34(65), pages 180-199, December.
    5. Harper, Ian R & Scheit, T, 1992. "The Effects of Financial Market Deregulation on Bank Risk and Profitability," Australian Economic Papers, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 31(59), pages 260-271, December.
    6. Stephen Martin & John Hawkins, 1992. "Banking And Deregulation," Economic Papers, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 11(1), pages 1-13, March.
    7. Kevin Davis, 1997. "Financial Restructuring In Australia," Economic Papers, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 16(2), pages 1-18, June.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)


    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.

    Cited by:

    1. Dumont, Michel & Cuyvers, Ludo, 2000. "Tigers and Pussy-Cats: The Importance of International Technology Transfer for Asian Felines," MPRA Paper 71292, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Rodriguez, X.A. & Exposito, P., 2004. "Models of Productivity in European Union, the USA and Japan," Applied Econometrics and International Development, Euro-American Association of Economic Development, vol. 4(4).
    3. Jakob B. Madsen* & Md. Rabiul Islam, 2012. "The Anatomy of the Asian Take-off," Institutions and Economies (formerly known as International Journal of Institutions and Economies), Faculty of Economics and Administration, University of Malaya, vol. 4(2), pages 1-24, July.
    4. Lloyd, P. J. & MacLaren, Donald, 2000. "Openness and growth in East Asia after the Asian crisis," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 11(1), pages 89-105.
    5. Mark Rogers, 2003. "A Survey of Economic Growth," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 79(244), pages 112-135, March.
    6. Kwack, Sung Yeung & Sun, Lee Young, 2005. "Economies of scale, technological progress, and the sources of economic growth: case of Korea, 1969-2000," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 27(3), pages 265-283, April.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • O11 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Macroeconomic Analyses of Economic Development
    • O47 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - Empirical Studies of Economic Growth; Aggregate Productivity; Cross-Country Output Convergence
    • O53 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Asia including Middle East


    Access and download statistics


    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bla:ecorec:v:74:y:1998:i:225:p:170-85. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Wiley-Blackwell Digital Licensing) or (Christopher F. Baum). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.