IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/bla/coecpo/v26y2008i2p299-316.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

A Comparative Analysis Of Payday Loan Customers

Author

Listed:
  • EDWARD C. LAWRENCE
  • GREGORY ELLIEHAUSEN

Abstract

"One of the most rapidly growing and controversial forms of consumer lending to recently emerge in the marketplace has been payday advances. This form of credit allows the borrower to obtain a small amount of cash for a short period of time. Claims of predatory lending often arise due to the high annual percentage rates that result from the fees for borrowing small amounts of money for 2 wk or less. By analyzing the data collected in a national survey of payday customers, this research allows policymakers to better understand what type of consumer borrows from payday lenders, for what purpose, and what the true benefits and costs are. The results confirm a strong demand for payday loans that satisfy a real financial need within a certain segment of the population. "("JEL "D12, D18, G20) Copyright (c) 2007 Western Economic Association International.

Suggested Citation

  • Edward C. Lawrence & Gregory Elliehausen, 2008. "A Comparative Analysis Of Payday Loan Customers," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 26(2), pages 299-316, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:coecpo:v:26:y:2008:i:2:p:299-316
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1465-7287.2007.00068.x
    File Function: link to full text
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Caskey, John P, 1991. "Pawnbroking in America: The Economics of a Forgotten Credit Market," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 23(1), pages 85-99, February.
    2. Brito, Dagobert L & Hartley, Peter R, 1995. "Consumer Rationality and Credit Cards," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 103(2), pages 400-433, April.
    3. Gregory Elliehausen, 2006. "Consumers' Use of High-Price Credit Products: Do They Know What They Are Doing?," NFI Working Papers 2006-WP-02, Indiana State University, Scott College of Business, Networks Financial Institute.
    4. Bizer, David S & DeMarzo, Peter M, 1992. "Sequential Banking," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 100(1), pages 41-61, February.
    5. Thaler, Richard H & Shefrin, H M, 1981. "An Economic Theory of Self-Control," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 89(2), pages 392-406, April.
    6. Carol C. Bertaut & Michael Haliassos, 2001. "Debt Revolvers for Self Control," University of Cyprus Working Papers in Economics 0208, University of Cyprus Department of Economics.
    7. David B. Gross & Nicholas S. Souleles, 2000. "Consumer Response to Changes in Credit Supply: Evidence from Credit Card Data," Center for Financial Institutions Working Papers 00-04, Wharton School Center for Financial Institutions, University of Pennsylvania.
    8. Edward Castronova & Paul Hagstrom, 2004. "The Demand for Credit Cards: Evidence from the Survey of Consumer Finances," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 42(2), pages 304-318, April.
    9. Robert B. Avery & Gregory E. Elliehausen & Arthur B. Kennickell, 1987. "Changes in consumer installment debt: evidence from the 1983 and 1986 surveys of consumer finances," Federal Reserve Bulletin, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.), issue Oct, pages 761-778.
    10. Thomas Durkin & Gregory Elliehausen, 1998. "The Cost Structure of the Consumer Finance Industry," Journal of Financial Services Research, Springer;Western Finance Association, vol. 13(1), pages 71-86, February.
    11. Matthew Rabin, 1998. "Psychology and Economics," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 36(1), pages 11-46, March.
    12. Thomas A. Durkin, 2000. "Credit cards: use and consumer attitudes, 1970-2000," Federal Reserve Bulletin, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.), issue Sep, pages 623-634.
    13. J. V. Poapst & W. R. WaterS, 1964. "Rates Of Return On Consumer Durables," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 19(4), pages 673-677, December.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. John Y. Campbell & Howell E. Jackson & Brigitte C. Madrian & Peter Tufano, 2011. "Consumer Financial Protection," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 25(1), pages 91-114, Winter.
    2. H. Damar, 2009. "Why Do Payday Lenders Enter Local Markets? Evidence from Oregon," Review of Industrial Organization, Springer;The Industrial Organization Society, vol. 34(2), pages 173-191, March.
    3. Wheatley, W. Parker, 2010. "Economic and Regional Determinants of the Location of Payday Lenders and Banking Institutions in Mississippi: Reconsidering the Role of Race and Other Factors in Firm Location," The Review of Regional Studies, Southern Regional Science Association, vol. 40(1), pages 53-69.
    4. Cliff A. Robb & Patryk Babiarz & Ann Woodyard & Martin C. Seay, 2015. "Bounded Rationality and Use of Alternative Financial Services," Journal of Consumer Affairs, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 49(2), pages 407-435, July.
    5. Marianne Bertrand & Adair Morse, 2011. "Information Disclosure, Cognitive Biases, and Payday Borrowing," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 66(6), pages 1865-1893, December.
    6. Richard W. Evans, 2012. "Determinants of Short-term Consumer Lending Interest Rates," BYU Macroeconomics and Computational Laboratory Working Paper Series 2012-07, Brigham Young University, Department of Economics, BYU Macroeconomics and Computational Laboratory.
    7. Taylor Canann & Richard Evans, 2015. "Determinants of Short-term Lender Location and Interest Rates," Journal of Financial Services Research, Springer;Western Finance Association, vol. 48(3), pages 235-262, December.
    8. repec:eee:quaeco:v:64:y:2017:i:c:p:94-107 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Guglielmo Forges Davanzati & Andrea Pacella, 2010. "Emulation, indebtedness and income distribution: A monetary theory of production approach," European Journal of Economics and Economic Policies: Intervention, Edward Elgar Publishing, vol. 7(1), pages 147-165.
    10. Robert Mayer, 2013. "When and Why Usury Should be Prohibited," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 116(3), pages 513-527, September.
    11. Tucker, Jenna N. & Key, Clinton C. & Grinstein-Weiss, Michal, 2014. "The benefits of saving at tax time: Evidence from the $aveNYC evaluation," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 50-61.
    12. Susan Payne Carter, 2015. "Payday Loan and Pawnshop Usage: The Impact of Allowing Payday Loan Rollovers," Journal of Consumer Affairs, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 49(2), pages 436-456, July.
    13. Clinton Key & Jenna N. Tucker & Michal Grinstein-Weiss & Krista Comer, 2015. "Tax-Time Savings among Low-Income Households in the $aveNYC Program," Journal of Consumer Affairs, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 49(3), pages 489-518, November.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • D12 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Economics: Empirical Analysis
    • D18 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Protection
    • G20 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - General

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bla:coecpo:v:26:y:2008:i:2:p:299-316. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Wiley-Blackwell Digital Licensing) or (Christopher F. Baum). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/weaaaea.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.