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Equiproportionate Growth of Incomes and After-Tax Inequality

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  • Moyes, Patrick

Abstract

On the one hand, progressive taxation in the sense of an increasing average tax rate is known to cut relative income differentials. On the other hand, equiproportionate additions to incomes generate a more than proportional increase of tax revenue under progressive taxation. The author proves in the paper that increasing residual progression is a necessary and sufficient condition for an equiproportionate growth in all incomes to reduce after tax inequality. Copyright 1989 by Blackwell Publishing Ltd and the Board of Trustees of the Bulletin of Economic Research

Suggested Citation

  • Moyes, Patrick, 1989. "Equiproportionate Growth of Incomes and After-Tax Inequality," Bulletin of Economic Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 41(4), pages 287-294, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:buecrs:v:41:y:1989:i:4:p:287-94
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Brander, James & Krugman, Paul, 1983. "A 'reciprocal dumping' model of international trade," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, pages 313-321.
    2. William Novshek, 1985. "On the Existence of Cournot Equilibrium," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 52(1), pages 85-98.
    3. Brander, James A. & Spencer, Barbara J., 1984. "Trade warfare: Tariffs and cartels," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, pages 227-242.
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    7. Myles, Gareth D, 1991. "Tariff Policy and Imperfect Competition," The Manchester School of Economic & Social Studies, University of Manchester, vol. 59(1), pages 24-44, March.
    8. Bulow, Jeremy I & Geanakoplos, John D & Klemperer, Paul D, 1985. "Multimarket Oligopoly: Strategic Substitutes and Complements," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 93(3), pages 488-511, June.
    9. Seade, Jesus, 1980. "The stability of cournot revisited," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 23(1), pages 15-27, August.
    10. Partha Dasgupta & Eric Maskin, 1986. "The Existence of Equilibrium in Discontinuous Economic Games, I: Theory," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 53(1), pages 1-26.
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    12. Brander, James A., 1981. "Intra-industry trade in identical commodities," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, pages 1-14.
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    Cited by:

    1. Contoyannis, Paul & Forster, Martin, 1999. "The distribution of health and income: a theoretical framework," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(5), pages 603-620, October.
    2. Marat Ibragimov & Rustam Ibragimov, 2007. "Market Demand Elasticity and Income Inequality," Economic Theory, Springer;Society for the Advancement of Economic Theory (SAET), vol. 32(3), pages 579-587, September.
    3. Valentino Dardoni & Peter Lambert,, 2000. "Progressivity comparisons," IFS Working Papers W00/18, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
    4. Dardanoni, Valentino & Lambert, Peter J., 2002. "Progressivity comparisons," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 86(1), pages 99-122, October.

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